Calendar

SamuelLowe&Family_1927

Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China
Screening and Author Talk with Paula Madison

Wednesday, May 20, 2015 | 6:30pm
Chinese American Museum

We love the overwhelming support of film screening of ‘Finding Samuel Lowe’ with Paula Madison on May 20th. Unfortunately, we have reached maximum capacity and cannot accept anymore RSVPs. Any guests that have sent their reservations to RSVP@camla.org should have received a confirmation from us.

If anyone who RSVP’d, but can no longer attend, please contact the front desk at 213.485.8567.

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Three successful black siblings from Harlem, Paula Williams Madison and her brothers, Elrick and Howard Williams, were raised in Harlem by their Chinese Jamaican mother, Nell Vera Lowe. The three travel to the Toronto Hakka Chinese Conference to discover their heritage by searching for clues about their long-lost Chinese grandfather, Samuel Lowe. As the mystery of their grandfather’s life unfolds, the trio travels to Jamaica, to learn about grandfather’s life.

Taking family tree research to an epic proportion, the siblings and 16 of their family members travel to two Chinese cities, ShenZhen and GuangZhou. Together, they visit their family’s ancestral village, finding documented lineage that dates their family back 3,000 years to 1006 BC. The trip culminates in an emotional and unforgettable family reunion with 300 of their grandfather’s Chinese descendants.

Facebook: FindingSamuelLowe
Twitter and Instagram: @findingsamlowe

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Chinese Family History Group of Southern California
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
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Asian and Asian American Studies @ Cal State LA
Visual Communications
Asian American Studies Center @ UCLA


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Thursday, May 28, 2015 | 7:00pm
Chinese American Museum

Panel Discussion
Please email RSVP@camla.org to reserve a seat

50 Years since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act

The 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act’s authors may not have fully realized the role that the Act would play in changing the face of the United States, and significantly increasing the number of Asian and Latino immigrants. This panel discussion will commemorate 50 years of this monumental point in American history and discuss its impact in Los Angeles.

This FREE event will be moderated by Linda Vo, Associate Professor of the Department of Asian American Studies, School of Humanities, of UC Irvine.

Panelists will include:

– Jose Calderon, Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Chicano/a and Latino/a Studies, Pitzer College
– The Honorable Mike Eng, Board of Trustees, Los Angeles Community College District
– Stewart Kwoh, President & Executive Director, Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Department of Cultural Affairs
OCA-GLA
UCLA Labor Center
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Los Angeles County
LA Plaza de Cultura Y Artes

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Signing of the Immigration Act of 1965

President Lyndon B. Johnson gives Edward (Ted) Kennedy a pen, while others, including Robert Kennedy and Vice President Hubert Humphrey look on

LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto


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Exploring the History of Chinese Pioneers: A Hike to Elysian Park

Saturday, May 2, 2015 | Starts at 8am
Chinese American Museum
Difficulty: easy, two star **, 7 miles; suitable for the whole family
Elevation gain/loss:   +600/-600 ft.

Join us for a half-day, 7-mile easy, half-street, half-trail hike to Elysian Park, concluding with a dim sum lunch.

Elysian Park was one of the training grounds for a secret army to support General Homer Lea/Dr. Sun Yat-Sen during the Chinese Revolution of 1911. A series of battles defeated the Qing Dynasty and established the Republic of China. The shooting range that trained 300 cadets during the Revolution is now the home of the Los Angeles Police Academy.

The hike will begin at the Chinese American Museum and end at a dim sum restaurant in Chinatown. Historical highlights of these Chinese Pioneers will be shared during the hike. The registration cost will cover the cost of the meal. Participants who wish to opt-out of the dim sum lunch will still need to pay for the full price of registration.

Recommended materials to bring:

  • 1 quart of water
  • Snacks
  • Hiking boots
  • First aid kit
  • Extra clothing

Please check the weather and dress accordingly. All participants must sign the liability waiver form before the hike; waivers can be viewed and downloaded here. Parents must provide consent and sign the waiver for participants under 18 years of age.

Please purchase your tickets in advance at here Brown Paper Ticket. For inquiries, please email rsvp@camla.org or call (213) 485-8567.

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Photo used with permission, creative common license, Eric Richardson, Flickr user ericrichardson


 

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Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants with Judy Yung

Saturday, March 28, 2015 | 10am
Chinese American Museum

Judy Yung, Professor Emeritus of American Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz and co-editor of the newly published 2nd ed. of Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island, 1910-1940, will discuss new research, poetry and oral histories of Chinese immigrants detained at the Angel Island Immigration Station.

Island tells these immigrants’ stories while underscoring their relevance to contemporary immigration issues. First published in 1980, this updated edition includes a new historical introduction, 150 annotated poems in Chinese and English translation, extensive profiles gleaned through oral histories, and dozens of additional photographs from public archives and family albums.

Books will be available for purchase and signed by Yung.

Space is limited. Reserve your space by emailing cfhgsc@gmail.com

Co-Presenters
家譜 Chinese Family History Group of Southern California – a Southern California Genealogical Society (SCGS) Interest Group and the Chinese American Museum

Community Partner
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California


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Lantern Festival
March 7, 12 Noon – 7 PM
Chinese American Museum

Visit www.camla.org/LALanternFestival for more details


 

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Social and Cultural Understandings of Being Disabled
December 14, 2014 | 3pm
Chinese American Museum

Join the Chinese American Museum as we explore the cultural barriers and stigmas surrounding mental, physical, and developmental disabilities in the Asian American community.

In Support of Transpacific Ties: Bridging Los Angeles and Hong Kong Through Art, an exhibit currently on view at the Chinese American Museum.

SPEAKERS

Raymond Kwong
Leadership Graduate
Asians and Pacific Islanders with Disabilities of California

Francis Siu, Ph.D., C.R.C.
Special Education and Counseling
California State University,Los Angeles.

Peter Wong, Ph.D.
Research Director,
Asians and Pacific Islanders with Disabilities of California

Please reserve your seat by emailing RSVP@camla.org

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Chinese American Citizens Alliance – Los Angeles Lodge
Exceptional Children’s Foundation
Charter College of Education – Cal State LA


 

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Chinese Islamic Cuisine: A Delectable Discussion
December 7, 2014 | 6pm

Chinese Islamic Restaurant
7727 E. Garvey Ave.
Rosemead, CA 91770

Directions to the Restaurant

$20 per person | $18 per CAM member

Join the Chinese American Museum as we host a dinner and engaging discussion at China Islamic Restaurant in Rosemead about the Muslim population in China and the role of Islam in Chinese culture.

Since the 7th century, Chinese Muslims have been a national ethnic minority, whose population is currently estimated at 30 million in the country, primarily in the northwest province. Chinese halal food evidences the cultural and culinary historical influence of the Silk Road, and brings it to 21st-century Los Angeles.

Featured dishes will include traditional green onion sesame bread, stews, and noodle dishes.
Chinese Islamic Cuisine: A Delectable Discussion is part of the LA / Islam Arts Initiative.  The initiative is presented by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) with major support from the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, the National Endowment for the Arts, the California Community Foundation, the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts), the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation, and the Sister Cities of Los Angeles Organization.

RSVP is required.  Space is limited.  You can reserve a seat by emailing rsvp@camla.org

Photography Courtesy of Rubina H. (yelp user)

 


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Liquid Heat: The Evolution, Production, and American Obsession of Hot Sauces
June 5, 2014 | 7pm
Chinese American Museum

Looking back to the 17th Century, Charles Perry discusses British attempts to make imitation soy sauce and its role in the evolution of hot sauces, and director Griffen Hammond screens his short documentary Sriracha that chronicles Huy Fong Food owner David Tran and the cult following that Sriracha has developed.

A Discussion by Charles Perry
Co-founder and President of the
Culinary Historians of Southern California

A Screening of Sriracha
by Griffin Hammond
Director and Writer

Community Partners
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Department of Cultural Affairs – Los Angeles
Cal Humanities
Culinary Historians of Southern California

*This project was made possible with support from Cal Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, visit www.calhum.org.


 

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A Decade of Change: Asian Pacific America from 2003-2014
Tuesday, May 27, 2014 | 7pm
Chinese American Museum

The Chinese American Museum celebrates its 10th anniversary by reflecting on events, challenges, and achievements within Asian Pacific America during the past decade. We invite you to join us as community members look back at events, community issues and policies that have impacted our communities in recent history.

PANELISTS

  • Warren Furutani, Director of  Serve the People Institute
  • Stewart Kwoh, First Vice Chair, Board of Directors of Asian American Advancing Justice
  • Ryan Wong, Curator of ‘Serve the People: The Asian American Movement in New York’

MODERATOR

Linda Vo, Department of Asian American Studies of University of California, Irvine

Please reserve your seat by emailing rsvp@camla.org or by calling 213.485.8567

‘A Decade of Change: Asian America from 2003-2014’ is part of CAM’s 10th Anniversary programming and observes Asian Pacific Islander American Heritage Month.


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Let’s Dish it Out!  A Discussion on Asian American Foodies
May 13, 7 PM
Chinese American Museum

Asian Americans utilize social media more than any other ethnic group in the United States.  This may explain why there appears to be a disproportionate number of Asian American food bloggers and “Yelpers” in Los Angeles.  This panel explores the growing influence and role of Asian Americans in contemporary Los Angeles food trends. Are Asians Americans truly the new “taste-makers” in Los Angeles, or even nationally?

Moderated by Nguyen Tran of Starry Kitchen, a formerly underground kitchen gone legal, the panel will include:
  • Cathy Chaplin, writer of ” The Food Lover’s Guide to Los Angeles” and creator of gastronomyblog.com.
  • Robert Ji-Song Ku, author of Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA, co-editor of Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader, and Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at Binghamton University.

Reserve your seat by email rsvp@camla.org

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Cal Humanities
Department of Cultural Affairs – City of Los Angeles
OCA-GLA
Culinary Historians of Southern California
Project by Project

“This project was made possible with support from Cal Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, visit www.calhum.org.”


Lantern Festival
March 1, 12 Noon – 10 PM
Chinese American Museum

Visit www.camla.org/LALanternFestival for more details


Author Talk with Sylvia Sun Minnick
March 18th, 7 PM
Chinese American Museum

The Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles hosts community activist and author Sylvia Minnick on March 18, 2014. Abandoned as an infant and raised as a refugee in Japanese-occupied Malaya during World War II, Never a Burnt Bridge is a memoir of humility, humor and pluck.

Reserve your seat by email rsvp@camla.org

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Friends of the Chinatown Library
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Chinese American Citizens Alliance


Past Events

CAM Exhibition Remix
January 19th, 2 – 4 PM
Chinese American Museum

Ten years ago CAM opened its doors to share with the public the Chinese American experience and the history in the region.  To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we revisit a few of these exhibits to discuss these topics through artistic expression. You will receive a unique experience of seeing selected works displayed once again, but this time, occupying the same space with one another to tell a new story.


El Pueblo Tree Lighting Ceremony
December 6th, 5pm – 9:45pm
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument

Kick off your holiday cheer with a season’s greeting card of your own making. Use the festive surroundings of El Pueblo to inspire memorable papercraft with your own personal holiday messages, guaranteed to generate warm smiles on a winter’s night. We provide the paper, markers, glue and scissors. You provide the creativity.


Origins: Uncovering Your Family History
December 14th, 10am – Noon
Chinese American Museum

In partnership with the Chinese Family History Group of Southern California, the Chinese America Museum will host Origins: Uncovering Your Family History on Saturday, December 14th at 10am to assist those who are beginning their quest to research and record their Chinese family histories.

Do you wish you knew more about your family’s history in China and in America, but don’t quite know how to begin to do the research? Do you want to find out how and why your ancestors immigrated and what kind of lives they led once they settled here? Would you like to uncover information and stories about your ancestors and their descendants, perhaps to construct your family tree, record your family history, or pen a biography of an interesting relative?

Join us as we share important resources for Chinese family history research and genealogy, tips on interviewing your relatives, visiting the National Archives to find immigration and Exclusion Act files, and what to know about Chinese names when doing research. Speakers will also highlight stories and case studies from their personal research on their ancestors.

Event is open to the public.  Please reserve your seat by emailing rsvp@camla.org

SPONSORS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Friends of the Chinatown Library
Asian Pacific Resource Center – County of Los Angeles Library
Asian Pacific American Library Association
Pacific Asia Museum


Monterey Park in the 80s and 90s:
Storefront Signage and the English-Only Movement
November 14th, 6:30 – 8:30 PM
Chinese American Museum

On Thursday, November 14th at 6:30pm, the Chinese American Museum will host a panel discussion on the controversy that enraged the ethnically diverse community of Monterey Park. Beginning in the 80s, the Slow-Growth movement and the English-Only movement, were attempts to slow down the population growth and limit Chinese language storefront signage. A recent review of the general code regarding signage in August 2013 has reignited the debate.

Join community members Jose Calderon, Ph.D. and Leland Saito, Ph.D. as they share how they organized against these movements; Los Angeles Times journalist Frank Shyong will also discuss his coverage of the community’s reactions this year when Monterey Park was forced to confront its past.

Event is open to the public.

Please reserve your seat on facebook or by emailing rsvp@camla.org.

More information on Monterey Park and the English-Only Movement can be found here: goo.gl/dYPX6c

Sponsors:
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Cal State LA – Asian & Asian Americans Studies Program
C.A.C.A. – Los Angeles Lodge
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Pitzer College’s Center for Asian Pacific American Students


Unity Observance
October 24th, 7 – 8:30 PM
Chinese American Museum

In Los Angeles on October 24, 1871, a mob of 500 local vigilantes publicly lynched and shot to death 18 Chinese men and boys in one of the most deadly incidents of racial violence ever recorded in the American West.  In the late 1800s and 1900s, anti-Chinese sentiment spread across the America and outbreaks of violence were recorded in Washington, Wyoming and Mexico against the Chinese.

The Chinese American Museum will host a discussion on October 24, 2013 to mark the 142nd year of the Chinese Massacre.  The event will feature a short film from film-maker Valerie Soe and a discussion from Dr. Robert Romero.  The Honorable Mike Eng will close the evening.

Event is open to the public.

Please reserve your seat by emailing rsvp@camla.org

More information can be found on our facebook event page by clicking here.

Sponsors:

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Cal State LA – Asian & Asian Americans Studies Program
Visual Communications
C.A.C.A. – Los Angeles Lodge
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
OCA-GLA
UCLA Asian American Studies Center


Shaping Los Angeles: The History Behind Historic Chinatown and Union Station
August 10th, 1 – 3:00 PM
Chinese American Museum

Join the Chinese American Museum and our community partners as we explore the significance of Alameda and Los Angeles Street while taking a closer look at the location of both Historic Chinatown and Union Station.

More information can be found on our facebook event page by clicking here.

Past Events