Past Events

Tea Talk: Teas of Japan

 

Date: Saturday, September 25, 2021 

Time: 2 – 3:30pm PDT 

Platform: Zoom 

Host/Moderator: Lan Ong 

Guest Speaker: Rika Iwasaki – Japanese Tea Instructor (leader rank), Tea Coordinator 岩﨑里香

CAM is excited to announce the return of “Tea Talk” on Saturday, September 25, 2021 from 2 – 3:30pm PDT. Host, FCAM board member, and Managing Director of @winghopfung Lan Ong welcomes Japanese Tea Instructor (Leader Rank) @rika5tea to share the history and cultural practices of Japanese tea.  Join us to learn about the many varieties of tea grown in Japan, tips on brewing green tea, and how to enjoy matcha at home. 

 

The virtual “Tea Talk” series welcomes audience members to learn about the many facets of tea from renowned experts from around the world.  

“Tea Talk: Teas of Japan” is the fourth installment of this series. To watch previous programs, please visit our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/chineseamericanmuseum.

Special Mid-Autumn Festival Story Time

Date: September 21, 2021 

Time: 4 – 4:30 pm PST 

Platform: Zoom  

Moderator: Kevine Ecliserio, Rita Law 

Guest Speakers: Grace Lin 

Join us for a special edition of “Kid’s Story Time” featuring guest author, Grace Lin, for a drawing demonstration and reading of “A Big Mooncake for Little Star”! 

In celebration of Mid-Autumn Festival, Grace Lin will be leading a drawing demonstration and reading “A Big Mooncake for Little Star,” a gorgeous picture book that tells a whimsical origin story of the phases of the moon. Little Star loves the delicious mooncake that she bakes with her mama. But she’s not supposed to eat any yet! What happens when she can’t resist a nibble? 

Thank you to our sponsor Panda Express.

About the author Grace Lin:

Grace Lin grew up in Upstate New York with her parents and two sisters. While the other sisters became scientists, Grace became an artist. Surprisingly enough, being an artist was not Grace’s first choice. She first dreamed of being a champion ice skater, and drew many pictures of herself twirling and dancing on the ice. Unfortunately, Grace had neither the talent nor coordination to make it to skating stardom. However, the pictures she drew of herself held much promise and quickly became Grace’s career focus. After attending the Rhode Island School of Design, Grace quickly set out to achieve her dream of creating children’s books. 

 

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series

 

Date: September 15, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST

Platform: Zoom w/ registration via Eventbrite

Host: Kevine Ecliserio

Speaker: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library

Book The Bear in My Family by Maya Tatsukawa

Join our next “Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors” on Wednesday, September 15 @ 4pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading “The Bear in My Family,” a gently humorous story about how an older sibling can really be a bear, but the younger sibling finds out that they can have their advantages, too. This book is written by Maya Tatsukawa.

This book is suited for children 4-8 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

Thank you to the sponsor Panda Express.

About the author Maya Tatsukawa:

Maya Tatsukawa is a children’s book illustrator and designer residing just outside of Boston. When she’s not designing, illustrating, or thinking about children’s books, you can find her baking desserts, eating ice cream, or searching for the perfect scone.

 

Family Ties 2.0 A Virtual Workshop

The Chinese American Museum and the Chinese Family History Group of Southern California are collaborating on “Family Ties 2.0.” This virtual workshop will take place on Saturday, August 28, 2021 from 10am – 5pm PDT.  

Sessions include:

  • “Navigating NARA Plus with Marisa Louie Lee” – Marisa will share strategies to achieve optimal results while navigating the National Archives databases.    
  • “Identifying and Locating Your Ancestral Village with John Wong” – John will advise on how to avoid common pitfalls of research and how to best identify the correct location of your family village. 
  • “Sharing Stories, Building Community with the Chinese American Museum” – CAM Executive Director Michael Truong and FCAM Board Chair Gay Yuen will share the museum’s mission of preserving Chinese American history and how we work to strengthen our community.  

Registrants will also have the opportunity to make appointments with experts to have family documents translated.  

Go to https://chinesefamilyhistory.org/inspire_events/family-ties-2-0-a-virtual-workshop/ to register and learn more, including requirements for translation services.   

Members of the Chinese American Museum and Chinese Family History Group of Southern California receive a discounted ticket option!   

Please note, the recording of this workshop will be made available only to registrants.    

 

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series on Aug. 25

Date: August 25, 2021  

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST     

Platform: Zoom w/ registration via Eventbrite    

Host: Kevine Ecliserio     

Speaker: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library

Book:  I Dream of Popo by Livia Blackburne

Join us in celebrating the one year anniversary of “Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors” on Wednesday, August 25 @ 4pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading “I Dream of Popo,” an emotionally rich picture book that celebrates a special connection that crosses time zones and oceans as Popo and her granddaughter hold each other in their hearts forever. This book is written by Livia Blackburne and illustrated by Julia Kuo.

This book is suited for children 4-8 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.   

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author Livia Blackburne:

Livia Blackburne is a Chinese American New York Times bestselling author who wrote her first novel while researching the neuroscience of reading at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Since then, she’s switched to full time writing. Livia was born in Taipei, Taiwan and moved to Albuquerque, NM when she was five. After a twelve year stint at Harvard and MIT, where she earned a AB in Biochemical Sciences and a PhD in cognitive neuroscience, she moved to Los Angeles, where she now lives with her husband and daughter. In her free time, Livia likes to karaoke, dance, and dabble in martial arts.

Thank you to our sponsor Panda Express

Doodle Over Your Own Photo With LIUCID

 

Date: July 30, 2021

Time: 3pm – 4pm  PDT

Platform: Zoom

Registration: Eventbrite

Guest Speakers: Annie Liu, LIUCID @liucid_

Presentation Style: Art making/Digital workshop

Join CAM and the artist LIUCID for an exciting digital artmaking workshop on July 30, 2021 @3pm PDT! LIUCID will be demonstrating how to doodle on your selfies or portraits of your friends and family. This follow-along workshop is designed for kids and teens (with adult supervision), though all are welcome to get creative with this unique activity!

To prepare for the workshop, download the free Let’s Draw app on your phone or tablet and select the photos you’d like to doodle on. A stylus is best for doodling on a device, but your fingers can work too!

About the artist:

The meaning behind LIUCID is two folds: 1) Clarity through connection (which is the basis of creativity). 2) Light- keep shining, your spark sparks others. LIUCID is all about living, creating, and teaching with the above mission statement in mind as well as sparking it in others!

Register now at camla.org/doodleworkshop to join the fun! 

 

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series on July 28

 

Date: July 28, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST

Platform: Zoom w/ registration via Eventbrite

Host: Kevine Ecliserio

Speaker: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library

BookAmy Wu and the Perfect Bao by Kat Zhang

Register for free now by following the link https://camla.org/storytime.

Join our next “Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors” on Wednesday, July 28 @ 4pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading “Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao,” a fun children’s book that introduces the funny, fierce, and fearless Amy Wu, who is determined to make a perfect bao bun today. Amy loves to make bao with her family but it takes skill to make the bao taste and look delicious! Tune in to find out if Amy will ever make the perfect bao!

Register for free now by following the link, camla.org/storytime. This book is suited for children 4-8 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author Kat Zhang:

Kat Zhang loves traveling to places both real and fictional–the former have better souvenirs, but the latter allow for dragons, so it’s a tough pick. A graduate of Vanderbilt University, she now spends her free time scribbling poetry, taking photographs, and climbing atop things she shouldn’t.

Thank you to our sponsor Panda Express

 

An Untold Past: Chinese Americans in the Midwest

 

Date: July 20, 2021

Time: 5 – 6:30 pm PDT

CAM’s ‘An Untold Past’ series is returning on July 20th from 5 – 6:30 pm PDT with a discussion about the Chinese American experience in the Midwest. Moderated by multimedia artist and art history Lecturer, Larry Lee, the discussion welcomes the voices of three artists, Chien-An Yuan, Frances Kai-Hwa Wang, and Jave Yoshimoto. The program offers a brief examination of how early Chinese Americans settled in Midwest states and a discussion into how descendants hold on to community and heritage today. The artists will share their experiences living and working in places that offer limited ways to connect to Asian American culture and how they have carved space to create opportunities and communities of their own.  

“An Untold Past” is a series developed by the Chinese American Museum to tell the often unknown history of Chinese diasporas in the US and around the world.

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series

Date: July 14, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST

Platform: Zoom w/ registration via Eventbrite

Host: Kevine Ecliserio

Speaker: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library

BookAlso an Octopus by Maggie Tokuda-Hall

 

Join our next “Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors” on Wednesday, July 14 @ 4pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading “Also an Octopus,” a fun children’s book that emphasizes the beauty and importance of imagination! This book begins by explaining that every story starts with nothing, and goes on to elaborate all of the exciting and imaginative things that Octopus wants to do!

Register for free now by following the link, camla.org/storytime. This book is suited for children 3-7 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author Maggie Tokuda-Hall:

Maggie Tokuda-Hall has a BA in Studio Art from Scripps College, and an MFA in Writing from University of San Francisco. She lives in Oakland, California with her husband, son, and objectively perfect dog.

Thank you to our sponsor Panda Express

Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors

Date: June 30, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PDT

Join our next Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors on Wednesday, June 30 @ 4 pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading, Mixed: A Colorful Story by Arree Chung. This vibrant, thought-provoking picture book is a story about the reds, the yellows, and the blues believing they’re the best; which in end, provides a beautiful message of acceptance and unity.

This book is suited for children 4-8 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author Arree Chung:

Arree Chung has worked in video games as a designer and art director. He is an award-winning author, illustrator, international speaker, and founder of Storyteller Academy. He began his career in consulting where he made lots of spreadsheets. Arree left the consulting field for an opportunity at Pixar where he learned the secret to success: loving what you do. To pursue his passion, Arree enrolled at the Art Center College of Design where he learned to draw, paint, and think differently.

Commemorating the Legacy of Vincent Chin

Date: Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Time: 5 – 6:15 pm PDT

Join CAM on June 23, 2021, @ 5 pm PDT for our annual commemoration of Vincent Chin, a Chinese American draftsman from Detroit brutally murdered in 1982 in an act of racism. His death sparked an outpouring of unity across the Asian American community and a call for justice nationwide as his murderers never received any jail time. During the COVID-19 pandemic and rise in anti-Asian hate, Chin’s story has resurged to the forefront.

This year’s panel discussion will pay tribute to Chin’s legacy in the Asian American Movement by igniting an important conversation about telling our stories with authenticity and reverence. In a year and a half filled with increased anti-Asian hate, the need to tell these stories has become direr. The panelists will discuss more suitable ways to respectfully honor historic Asian American stories.

The Chinese American Museum is honored to host Commemorating the Legacy of Vincent Chin by welcoming the following speakers:

Moderators
Helen Zia, activist, author, and former journalist
Annie Tan, special education teacher, writer, activist, and cousin of Vincent Chin

Panelists
Paula Madison, FCAM 1st Vice-Chair, former NBC executive, CEO of Madison Media Management LLC

Lisa Ling, journalist, author, and TV/film producer

Renee Tajima-Peña, co-filmmaker of the film, Who Killed Vincent Chin? and UCLA professor

Donald Young, TV/film producer and Director of Programs for the Center for Asian American Media

*  *  *

Moderator Bios

Helen Zia is a writer, activist, and Fulbright Scholar. The daughter of immigrants from China, Zia’s groundbreaking journalism and community organizing was crucial in bringing federal civil rights charges against the murderers of Vincent Chin. The landmark civil rights case is featured in the documentary film Who Killed Vincent Chin? In 2002 Zia was appointed to serve as executor to the Chin estate. In 2010, she was a witness in the case for marriage equality that went to the Supreme Court. A graduate of Princeton University’s first coeducational class, Zia has received two honorary doctorates. After attending medical school, she became a community organizer, construction laborer, autoworker, and after which she discovered her life’s work as a writer. Her first book, Asian American Dreams chronicled the emergence of AAPIs in contemporary America; her second book, My Country Vs. Me, about physicist Wen Ho Lee who was falsely accused of being a spy. Her latest book is Last Boat out of Shanghai.

Annie Tan is a special education teacher, storyteller, writer, speaker, and activist based in Chinatown, New York. Her work focuses on growing up Asian American and as a kid of immigrants, teaching, teachers unions, and public education, and organizing for a better world. Tan’s work has been featured in The New York Times, Huffington Post, The New Republic, PBS’ Asian Americans, and twice on The Moth Radio Hour. She is currently working on her first book, a memoir, and hopes one day to write an epic book about her family and Asian American history. Tan keynoted the Museum of the City of New York’s “Teaching Social Activism” Conference in May 2019, and has performed as a storyteller and speaker with the Moth Mainstage and other shows, including hosting shows and fundraisers. Tan is also a cousin of Vincent Chin and great-grand-niece of Lily Chin.

Speaker Bios

Paula Williams Madison is Chairman and CEO of Madison Media Management LLC, a Los Angeles-based media consultancy company with a global reach. In 2011, Madison retired from NBCUniversal, where she had been Executive Vice President of Diversity as well as a Vice President of the General Electric Company (GE), then the parent company of NBCU. Honored for corporate leadership and community outreach, Madison was named one of the “75 Most Powerful African Americans in Corporate America” by Black Enterprise Magazine in 2005 and included in the Hollywood Reporter’s “Power 100.” In 2014 she was recognized as one of the Outstanding 50 Asian Americans in Business and honored by the East West Players and AARP with their Visionary Award. Madison is currently the First Vice-Chair of the Friends of the Chinese American Museum.

Renee Tajima-Peña is an Academy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker whose previous films include Who Killed Vincent Chin?, My America…or Honk if You Love Buddha, No Más Bebés. Tajima-Peña is the series producer of Asian Americans, the ground-breaking 5-part docuseries on the Asian American experience that aired on PBS in May 2020. The first-ever television history of its kind. Her company, Tajima-Peña Productions produced the series in association with the Center for Asian American Media, WETA, the Independent Television Service, and Flash Cuts. She is co-founder/executive producer of the May 19 Project a social media campaign that centers the legacy of AAPI solidarity with other communities at www.seeusunite.org/unite.

Lisa Ling is an award-winning journalist, host, and executive producer of the CNN Original Series, This is Life with Lisa Ling. Previously, she was a reporter on Channel One News, a co-host on the ABC daytime talk show The View (1999–2002), the host of National Geographic Explorer (2003–2010), and a special correspondent for The Oprah Winfrey Show. She is the co-author of Mother, Daughter, Sister, Bride: Rituals of Womanhood and Somewhere Inside: One Sister’s Captivity in North Korea and the Other’s Fight to Bring Her Home, which she penned with her sister, Laura. In 2014, President Obama named Ling to the Commission on White House Fellows.

Donald Young is the Center for Asian American Media’s Director of Programs. He oversees CAAM’s program areas and specifically develops and implements CAAM’s national productions and national PBS strategies. In public television, Young has supervised the national broadcasts of over 150 award-winning projects. As a producer, he has worked both in documentaries and independent feature films. Key projects include the epic five-hour PBS history series Asian Americans, a co-production with WETA and produced by Renee Tajima-Peña; Family Pictures, USAby Thomas Allen Harris; and a feature film adaptation of Chang-rae Lee’sComing Home Againdirected by Wayne Wang.

Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors

Date: Wednesday, June 16, 2021

Time: 4 – 4:30 pm PDT

Join our next Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors on Wednesday, June 16 @ 4 pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading Bear and Chicken, a funny and clever friendship tale that teaches kids that things are not always as they seem, while learning a thing or two about making soup with a friend.

This book is suited for children 3-5 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author Jannie Ho:
Jannie Ho has a BFA in illustration from Parsons The New School of Design and has been an in-house graphic designer at Nickelodeon and Scholastic, as well as art director for TIME Magazine for Kids. Since 2006, she has been doing illustration work full-time. Jannie lives in Boston, MA.

Chinese American World War II Veterans Congressional Gold Medal Presentation

Date: Monday, May 31, 2021

Time: 10 – 11 am PDT

This Memorial Day, we will honor Chinese American World War II Veterans with a Congressional Gold Medal Presentation.
This virtual ceremony is hosted by the Chinese American Citizens Alliance as part of the Chinese American WWII Veterans Recognition Project. All registered veterans in the SoCal region will be honored in a roll call and will be awarded their Congressional Gold Medals at a future event.
You can watch the presentation by clicking here

Join Us as We Celebrate the Life of Renown Photojournalist, Corky Lee

Date: Sunday, May 30, 2021

Time: 6 pm ET / 3 pm PT

One can not celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage month without thinking of Corky Lee whose photos for the past five decades captured the movement and moments of the APIA community. Corky was a fixture at APIA events and he used his camera to bring Asian American stories to the mainstream consciousness. His untimely passing from COVID has been devastating because we lost a real treasure in our community.

Known as the “Undisputed Unofficial Asian American Photographer Laureate,” Corky Lee was a great friend to many and well-loved by the community. Because of the pandemic, many were unable to attend Corky’s funeral service so we’re having a virtual interfaith memorial service featuring Christian and Buddhist prayers along with special performances to celebrate and pay tribute to Corky’s life.

Performances include:

Chen Dance Center
Cynthia Lin
Diane Phelan
Joann Lee
NAAP
Nobuko Mikaymoto
NYCCC
Pan Asian Repertory Theater
Slant
Soh Daiko
Taiyo Na
Taka Kigawa

There will be an interactive portion of the program, so please have a blank paper and pen ready.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Authors

Date: Wednesday, May 26, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PDT

Happy Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month! In celebration, join our next Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors on Wednesday, May 26 @ 4 pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading Crab Cake, a story about taking care of yourself when the mistake is not your own, written by Andrea Tsumuri.

This book is suited for children 3-5 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author Andrea Tsumuri:

Andrea Tsumuri is an illustrator and cartoonist born and raised in New York. Andrea has a passion for history, an MFA from the School of Visual Arts, and a Society of Illustrators Silver Medal. She now lives and draws in Philadelphia alongside her husband and their dog, Spatula.

Year of the Ox Artist Showdown

Date: Tuesday, May 25, 2021

Time: 5 – 6 pm PDT

Join CAM and four featured artists from our first-ever online exhibition, Year of the Ox, for an Artist Showdown on May 25, 2021 @ 5 pm PDT! Artists include Annie Wong, Mark Wang, Michael C. Hsiung, and Rose Wong and hosted by Year of the Ox curator, Albert Chau.

This Artist Showdown will task our dueling friends to tap into their improvisational skills for friendly and unpredictable challenges. Watch and listen as we get to know these four incredible artists and see what works of art they’ll create!

The Year of the Ox online exhibition is available to view until June 6, 2021. Follow the link to check out all 14 featured artists! http://exhibitions.camla.org/yearoftheox

Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors

Date: May 14, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST

Happy Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month! In celebration, join our next Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors on Friday, May 14 @ 4 pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading Outside, Inside,  a story celebrating essential workers and the community coming together to face the challenges of the global COVID-19 pandemic, written by LeUyen Pham.

This book is suited for children 3-5 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author LeUyen Pham:

LeUyen Pham is the award-winning and critically acclaimed illustrator of more than one hundred books for children. Born in Vietnam, LeUyen and her family fled Vietnam in the final days of the Vietnam War. Growing up in Southern California, LeUyen always loved to doodle and draw. LeUyen got an interview at the prestigious Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and earned a degree in illustration. Following school, LeUyen worked as a layout artist for DreamWorks Feature Animation and illustrated books on the side. She adores traveling and speaking, but given her way would spend all her time making Star Wars-themed birthday cakes.

Tea Talk: Exploring the History and Diversity of Indian Teas

Date: May 11, 2021

Time:  6 – 7:30 pm PDT

The much-anticipated return of Tea Talk is here! Join us on May 11, 2021, from 6 – 7:30 pm PDT for Tea Talk: Exploring the History and Diversity of Indian Teas. We are honored to welcometwo Indian tea experts, Husna-Tara Prakash and Shalini Prakash Agarwal who are members of one of India’s pioneering tea planting families at the Glenburn Tea Estate located high in the Himalayas.

The two will share the history of tea in India as well as glimpses into the cultivation and rituals of tea production from their own tea estate. Accompanying the program will be Tea Talk host Lan Ong, FCAM board member and Managing Director of Wing Hop Fung.

The virtual Tea Talk series welcomes audience members to learn about the many facets of tea from renowned experts from around the world.

Thank you to our community sponsors:

Wing Hop Fung

Glenburn Fine Indian Tea

Chinese American Citizens Alliance, Los Angeles

Grand Park

It Matters: Revisiting Vincent Chin and His Historic Impact on the Asian American Movement

 

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Time: 5pm – 6pm PDT

CAM invites you to take a seat with Paula Yoo and Pam Ng on May 4, 2021, @ 5 pm as they discuss themes explored in the timely release of Yoo’s YA nonfiction book, From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement. Listen in as Paula and Pam talk about the tragedy of Vincent Chin, the resonating wounds of racial injustice, and the present call to end discrimination towards Asian Americans so many years later.

From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry, releases April 20, 2021. Order your copy of the book at Eso Won Books – An Independent Black-Owned Bookshop in Los Angeles here.

Thank you to our community partners:
Norton Young Readers
Eso Won Bookstore
Act To Change
Artists at Play
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association – CCBA 羅省中華會館
East West Players
Grand Park
Japanese American National Museum
NextShark
Visual Communications

Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors

Date: April 30, 2021

Time: 4:00 pm PDT

Join our next Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors on Friday,  April 30 @ 4 pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading ‘“Could You Lift Up Your Bottom?”,’ a story about creative problem solving by differentiating, naming, and combining shapes written by Hee-Jung Chang with illustrations by Sung-Hwa Chung.

Register for free now by following the link camla.org/storytime. This book is suited for children 3-5 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author Hee-Jung Chang:
Hee-Jung Chang majored in psychology at Ewha Woman’s University in Seoul, South Korea, and studied developmental psychology at the university’s graduate school. An active member of a children’s book group for professional authors, Hee-Jung has written many books for children.

A Chinese American Giant: The Y.C. Hong Story

Post Film Panel Discussion with Director Rick Quan 

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Time: 5:00 pm PDT

Join us for a screening of the documentary film, “A Chinese American Giant: The Y.C. Hong Story” followed by an insightful panel discussion.

Film director Rick Quan joins the panel to discuss the significance of Y.C. Hong’s contribution to American society. Panelists include the son of Y.C. Hong, Nowland Hong, community historian, Eugene Moy and curator of the Pacific Rim Collection at The Huntington Library, Li Wei Yang. Panelists will discuss Hong’s life and legacy as one of the first Chinese American lawyers in the U.S. whose advocacy helped unite thousands of Chinese families during the period of the Chinese Exclusion Act.

You can screen the documentary from the comfort of your home; all registrants will receive a link to view the documentary a week before the event. We will reconvene on April 20 for the discussion at 5 pm.

This program is presented by the Chinese American Citizens Alliance in collaboration with the Chinese American Museum, the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California & the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, Los Angeles

Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors

Date: April 14, 2021

Time: 4 PM PST

Book: Goldy Luck and the Three Pandas by Natasha Yim

Join our next Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors on Wednesday, April 14 @ 4 pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading Goldy Luck and the Three Pandas, written by Natasha Yim and illustrated by Grace Zong. The book is a fun and festive story that retells the tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears.

This book is suited for children 3-5 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision. 

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author 

Natasha Yim is an American Chinese children’s and young adult author. When she was in 7th grade, an English teacher gave her the assignment to create her own island, makeup names of lakes, mountains, cities, with interesting characters and write a story. She had so much fun using her imagination, she wanted to be a writer ever since. Most of her career has been in counseling or social work. It was there, reading and telling stories to kids who were away from their families, that she discovered the power of stories to soothe, comfort, and inspire children.

Family Ties: Adventures in Finding My Family Stories

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: April 13, 2021

Time: 5 – 6pm PDT

On April 13, 2021 @ 5 pm PDT, the inaugural program, Adventures in Finding My Family Stories, welcomes moderator Michael Ho who will ask panelists Marisa Louie Lee, Bo-Gay Tong Salvador, and Brian Yee to share their personal experiences with their genealogy adventure. The panelists will share what motivated them to uncover pieces of their family history, their most meaningful discoveries, and what inspires them to continue searching for answers.

CAM and the Chinese Family History Group of Southern California are collaborating to present Family Ties, a series of virtual programs made to inspire viewers to start exploring their own family history. Throughout the series, each program will feature a diverse group of speakers who can offer different perspectives and ideas to approach the genealogy journey.

Thank you to our community partners:

  • Visual Communications
  • Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
  • The China Society of Southern California
  • Bay Area Chinese Genealogy Group

Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors

Date: March 24, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PDT   

Host: Kevine Ecliserio   

Speaker: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library 

Book: Drawn Together by Minh Lê

Join our next Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors on Wednesday, March 24 @ 4 pm PDT. Miss Rita will be reading Drawn Together, a story about the struggles of communication between generations and language divides written by Minh Lê with illustrations by Dan Santat.

This book is suited for children 3-5 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

About the author Minh Lê:

Minh Lê is the author of many award-winning picture books such as “Lift,” “Let Me Finish!” and “The Perfect Seat.” “Drawn Together” was honored with several awards including the 2019 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature – Picture Book Winner. Lê earned a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Dartmouth and a master’s in Ed Policy from the Harvard Graduate School in Education. He is a federal early childhood policy expert who has worked in education at the national, state, and local level – both in and out of the classroom. Lê also serves on the Board of We Need Diverse Books and has written for a variety of publications, including the New York Times, The Horn Book, NPR, and HuffPost.

Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors

Date: March 12, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST   

Host: Kevine Ecliserio   

Speaker: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library 

Book:  Fortune Cookie Fortunes by Grace Li

Join our next Kid’s Story Time Featuring Asian American Children’s Authors on Friday, March 12 @ 4pm PST. Miss Rita will be reading Fortune Cookie Fortunes, by Grace Lin.

This book is suited for children 3-7 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

A little bit about the author Grace Lin:

Before Grace Lin was an award-winning and NY Times bestselling author and illustrator, she was the only Asian girl (except for her sisters) going to her elementary school in Upstate NY. That experience, good and bad, has influenced her books and caused Grace to persevere for diversityIn addition to her many children’s books, she is an occasional New England Public Radio commentator and gave TEDx talk, “The Windows and Mirrors of Your Child’s Bookshelf,” confronting representation in kid’s literature. She continued this mission with a hundred episodes of the podcast kidlitwomen* and now currently hosts two other podcasts: Book Friends Forever and Kids Ask Authors. In 2016, Grace’s art was displayed at the White House and she was recognized by President Obama’s office as a Champion of Change for Asian American and Pacific Islander Art and Storytelling.

20th Anniversary Los Angeles Lantern Festival

 

Visit our site here to watch the recording!

The Chinese American Museum presents the 20th anniversaryof the Los Angeles Lantern Festival on Saturday, March 6, 2021 starting at 12:00 noon PST. CAM is excited to host this milestone by inviting you to a virtual celebration as we welcome the ‘Year of the Ox’ with lion dancing, family-friendly activities, and much more!🐂🐉

The Silent Auction will run from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm PST on the day of the event. For a sneak peek of itemsgo toone.bidpal.net/lanternfestival2021/preview

Featuring performances from:
– Immortals Lion Dance Troupe
– Kayamanan Ng Lahi
– Perfect Harmony Cultural Exchange Association
– Purple Silk Music Education Foundation
– Yuujou Daiko
– Wangbao He 何王保 / Xiaoqing Chu 楚小青
– Ballet Folklorico “Y Arrìba Mèxico”
– Korean Classical Music and Dance Company
– Connie Lim as MILCK
– Chinese American Dancing Group
Arts & Crafts demonstrations led by:
– Felt Dumpling Making by Miss Rita
– Red Envelope Making by Jessica Wong
– Peach Blossom Branch by Fiona & Rachelle Shumard
– Spring Character Cutting by Dora Quach
– Money Folding by 黃翠媚Tsui Mee Wong
– Chinese God of Fortune by Evelyn Wong
– Cut Paper Oxen by Bovey Lee
– Pellet Drum by Kera Ung
– Abacus Making by United Abacus Arithmetic Association
– Year of the Ox by Liucid

For twenty years, the Los Angeles Lantern Festival has captured the spirit of this 5,000-year-old Chinese tradition of bringing in a new beginning and hope for the upcoming year. The festival showcases a broad spectrum of arts, performances, folk crafts, literature and lanterns. The event has engaged multi-generational families in the sharing of Chinese American culture, building of community relations, and celebrating our city’s diversity.🏮

The Los Angeles Lantern Festival is generously sponsored by:

– The Friends of the Chinese American Museum
– Los Angeles County Arts & Culture
– City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs 
– El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
– FCAM Board President Dr. Gay Q. Yuen
– Lantern Festival Event Producer, Jaclyn Kalkhurst

 

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series

Date: February 24, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST   

Next up on Kid’s Story Timewith CAMfeatures a special Lunar New Year story by author Ying Chang Compestine titled The Runaway Rice Cake onFebruary 24, 2021, @ 4 pm PST.

Ying Chang Compestine is a Chinese-American author of over 20 booksHer keen interest in cuisine has led her to weave food into all of her writing— including cookbooks, novels, and picture books for young readers. She has been named as one of the 50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading by the Author’s Show.

This book is suited for 5-8 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time with CAM is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library featuring AAPI authors with stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

Book Talk and Drawing Demonstration

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: February16, 2021

Time: 5 – 6 pm PST

CAM is pairing up with the Friends of the Chinatown Library to present a family-friendly program on February 16, 2021 @ 5 pm PST.

Join co-authors, Oliver Chin and Phil Amara, and illustrator Juan Calle, as they present their latest collaboration, Awesome Asian Americans, which spotlights 20 trailblazing Asian American individuals. The two authors will share their inspiration behind the children’s book and read some of their favorite excerpts. The program will include a special live drawing demonstration of the vibrant, graphic novel style illustrationsby Calle.

Attendees will receive a special promo code during the live event for 10% off anautographed copy of the book.

Awesome Asian Americans: 20 Stars Who Made America Amazingoffers short biographies and unique artistic depictions of individuals whose remarkable contributions helped shape America including some of CAM’s past Historymaker Honorees such as Tyrus Wong, Helen Zia, and Judge Dolly Gee.

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: February 10, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST   

Guest Speaker: Oliver Chin

Join Miss Rita for a special edition of Kid’s Story Time with CAM featuring guest author, Oliver Chin on Wednesday, February 10, 2021 @ 4pm PST!

In celebration of Lunar New Year Oliver Chin will be reading his book, “The Year of the Ox.”

This book is suited for 4-8 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time with CAM is hosted in partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library focusing on Asian American-themed stories shared by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

Tea Talk part 2 – Stories of a Leaf: Journey into the World of Tea, Focus: Korean Tea Culture

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: February 9, 2021

Time: 5pm – 6:30pm PST

Host/Moderator: Lan Ong

Guest Speakers: Yoon Hee Kim, TeaClassics, Global Tea and Culinary Educator 김윤희金允姬

Take a journey into the world of Korean tea culture, with global tea and culinary educator Yoon Hee Kim, on another installment of CAM’s “Tea Talk” series.

In part 2 of “Stories of a Leaf,” tea master Yoon Hee Kim will guide the audience into the foundations of Korean tea, including tea rituals, uses, steeping and beyond. Kim will also perform a demonstration of a traditional Korean Tea ceremony.

Yoon Hee Kim is an internationally renowned and sought-after tea educator, artist, and expert with over 20 years of research and practice. For decades, Kim has guided students and professionals through tea and food experiences in the United States, Europe, and Asia. Kim, a lifelong learner, a classically trained chef, and a chef instructor of Korean cuisine, continues to research, source, and study tea, while also teaching and performing in the U.S. and abroad.

The virtual “Tea Talk” series is hosted by FCAM board member and Managing Director of Wing Hop Fung, Lan Ong, and welcomes audience members to learn about the many facets of tea from renowned experts from around the world.

Thank you to our community partners:

Wing Hop Fung

An Untold Past: Chinese in the Caribbean

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: February 2, 2021

Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm PST

Panelists
Alexandra Chang, Associate Professor of Practice – Rutgers University-Newark
Evelyn Hu-DeHart, Ph.D., Professor – Brown University (Hu Qi-yu胡其瑜)
Kathleen López, Ph.D., Associate Professor- Rutgers University-New Brunswick
Martin A. Tsang, Ph.D., Cuban Heritage Collection Librarian and Curator of Latin American Collections – University of Miami

Moderator
Paula Madison

An Untold Past returns by delving into the experience of Chinese in the Caribbean on February 2, 2021, at 5 pm PST. Join FCAM 1st Vice President Paula Madison along with four scholars as we take a look into the history of the Chinese diaspora in the region. Each will share their knowledge about the many facets of Chinese Caribbean culture and what makes their immigration history so compelling.

Topics include the formation of intermixed families, syncretism, and art. Together, the fascinating complexities of Caribbean culture make for a unique Chinese diaspora.

An Untold Past is a CAM program series revealing the often-unknown history of Chinese diasporas in places across the nation and around the world.

Tea Talk part 1 –  Stories of a Leaf: Journey into the World of Tea and Korean Tea Culture


The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: January 12, 2021

Time: 5pm – 6:30pm PST

Host/Moderator: Lan Ong

Guest Speaker: Yoon Hee Kim, TeaClassics. Global Tea and Culinary Educator 김윤희金允姬

Take a journey into the world of tea and Korean tea culture, with global tea and culinary educator Yoon Hee Kim, on CAM’s second installment of Tea Talk.

In Stories of a Leaf, tea master Yoon Hee Kim will guide the audience into the foundations of tea, uses, traditions, steeping, and beyond. Kim will further discuss the early development of Korean tea and Korean tea rituals and give an overview of the various types of Korean tea.

Yoon Hee Kim is an internationally renowned and sought-after tea educator, artist, and expert with over 20 years of research and practice. For decades, Kim has guided students and professionals through tea and food experiences in the United States, Europe, and Asia. Kim, a lifelong learner, a classically trained chef, and a chef instructor of Korean cuisine, continues to research, source, and study tea, while also teaching and performing in the U.S. and abroad.

The virtual Tea Talk series is hosted by FCAM board member and Managing Director of Wing Hop Fung, Lan Ong, and welcomes audience members to learn about the many facets of tea from renowned experts from around the world.

Thank you to our community partners:

Wing Hop Fung

Grand Park’s NYELA Countdown Celebration

Join the countdown to 2021 with Grand Park for their New Year’s Eve celebration on Fuse.

The festivities will kick off on Thursday at 11 p.m. PST.

The Chinese American Museum, represented by FCAM Board President Dr. Gay Q. Yuen, will be featured along with other community organizations in a Fuse broadcast on Dec. 31st. You can also watch via streaming channels through Fuse’s YouTube Channel, Grand Park’s YouTube channel, and the NYELA website.

Celebrate with us as CAM turns 17 on December 18, 2020!

In honor of our birthday, we will be hosting two exciting family-friendly programs!  

Kid’s Story Time with CAM! @ 2 pm – 2:30 pm PST

Children of all ages are welcome to join Miss Rita as she reads, “Hooray for Hat!” by Brian Won. Be ready to sing songs and join the fun. Kid’s Story Time with CAM is a partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library presenting a short story time series featuring Asian American-themed stories and authors.
This book is suited for ages 4-7, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.


The ABC’s of Storytelling through Photography @ 5pm – 6pm PST

Turn celebration memories into art with award-winning photographer Karen Zhou! This interactive photography workshop will teach beginning photographers the art of composition, experimenting with and exploring viewpoints and perspectives.  During the program, Karen will share some of her own celebratory photos of festivals in the Asian American Pacific Islander community.

We invite you to bring a camera, smartphone, or tablet and a toy or object to practice your photography skills. Karen will also answer participant questions towards the end of the program if time permits.

This program is suitable for ages 8 and above, families welcome.

Kid’s Story Time with CAM & the LAPL Chinatown Branch


Date: November 24, 2020

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST

Storyteller: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library

Book: The Empty Pot by Demi

Join us Thanksgiving week on Tuesday, November 24, 2020, @ 4 pm PST for our next virtual Kid’s Story Time with CAM!

Gather up the little ones and find a cozy spot to join along! We are continuing our partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library to present a short storytime series featuring Asian American themed stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.

Next on the series:  Miss Rita reads  The Empty Pot by Demi.

Space is limited, register for free now by clicking here.

This book is suited for 4-8 years old, though we welcome children of all ages with parental supervision.

Kid’s Story Time with CAM is a virtual program hosted on Zoom, registration via Eventbrite required.

Stronger Together: Black Liberation and Asian Solidarity 


 

Date: November 19, 2020 

Time: 5:00pm – 6:30pm PST 

Speakers: Warren Furutani, Melina Abdullah, Kai Naima Williams 

Moderator: Sandra So Hee Chi Kim  

The USC Pacific Asia Museum, the Chinese American Museum, and the Japanese American National Museum present Stronger Together: Black Liberation and Asian Solidarity. 

Join a discussion on this historic moment in the movement for Black lives and the importance of cross-movement solidarity and coalitional consciousness. Our panelists will reflect on the history of Black-Asian solidarity and what we can learn from the past in order to live in a liberated future. The panel will also offer thoughts on how we can move forward following the much-anticipated November 3rd presidential election results. 

Our Guests 

MELINA ABDULLAH 

co-founder of Black Lives Matter Los Angeles and Professor of Pan-African Studies 

KAI NAIMA WILLIAMS 

Author and Executive Director of Eat At The Table Theatre Company 

WARREN R. FURUTANI 

Co-founder of the Manzanar Committee and former California State Assemblymember 

Moderated by 

SANDRA SO HEE CHI KIM 

Founder and Co-Executive Director of Asian American Justice + Innovation Lab

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series

Date: November 5, 2020  

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PST   

Book: Chopsticks by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

We hope you can tune in virtually for Kid’s Story Time with CAM on Thursday, November 5, 2020, @ 4 pm PST! Gather up the little ones and find a cozy spot to join along! We are continuing our partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library to present a short storytime series featuring Asian American themed stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.     

Next on the series:  Miss Rita reads  Chopsticks by Amy Krouse Rosenthal.    

Space is limited, register for free now by clicking here. This virtual story-time will be hosted on Zoom and is suitable for 3-5 years old with parental supervision.     

The Commemoration of the 1871 Los Angeles Chinese Massacre

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

On October 24th, 2020 @ 5:00 p.m. PDT, the Chinese American Museum will commemorate the historic tragedy known as the Los Angeles Chinese Massacre of 1871, the result of growing anti-Chinese sentiment in the region. One of the most heinous acts of racially motivated violence Los Angeles has ever experienced took place in the streets near our present-day museum.
We invite you to stand with us virtually in commemorating the lives lost 149 years ago.

The commemoration marks this somber moment in American history with a memorial for all the lives lost in this historical tragedy and creates a space for reflection on contemporary issues of race and violence.

In addition to the performance of an excerpt from Lloyd Suh’s play “The Chinese Lady,” by Artists at Play, the following individuals will be participating in the solemn observance:

– Honorable Judy Chu, Representative, United States Congress
– Honorable Ed Chau, Member, California State Assembly
– David Louie, President, El Pueblo de Los Angeles Commission
– Arturo Chavez, General Manager, El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
– Dr. Gay Yuen, President, Friends of the Chinese American Museum
– Artists at Play’s director Rebecca Wear and actress Amy Shu will present an excerpt from Lloyd Suh’s play, “The Chinese Lady.”
– Michael Truong, Executive Director, Chinese American Museum

We would like to thank El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument and Artists at Play for supporting this event.

Podcast with Artist at Play: The Chinese Lady


Join the Chinese American Museum and Artists at Play for a conversation about “The Chinese Lady” by Lloyd Suh, its connection to the history of Chinese in America, and what role the arts play in the interpretation and remembering of that history.

Panelists include Rena Heinrich (USC Professor of Theatre Practice), Eugene Moy (Chinese American Museum board member), and Rebecca Wear (director of AAP’s 2019 production of The Chinese Lady), moderated by AAP Producing Artistic Leader Stefanie Lau.

The conversation will be recorded as part of the AAP Podcast inaugural season. 

This event is co-presented with the Chinese American Museum to commemorate the 149th anniversary of the Los Angeles Chinese Massacre.

Studying Our Past, Shaping Our Future #4


The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

CAM invites you to tune in on Saturday, October 3rd, 2020 from 7:30 – 8:30 pm PDT for the fourth-panel discussion in the “Studying Our Past, Shaping Our Future” series via Zoom. Join us as we hear from a younger generation about how they navigate life’s challenges during the pandemic.

The majority of the program will be in Mandarin. More information can be found on the flyer.

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series

   

Date: October 1, 2020  

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PDT   

Host: KevineEcliserio   

Story teller: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library   

Book: Round is a Mooncake by Roseanne Thong 

Celebrate Mid-Autumn Moon Festival with CAM! Tune in virtually for Kid’s Story Time with CAM on Thursday, October 1, 2020 @ 4pm PDT! Gather up the little ones and find a cozy spot to join along!  We are continuing our partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library to present a short story time series featuring Asian American themed stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.     

Next on the series: Miss Rita reads Round is a Mooncake by Roseanne Thong.    

This virtual story-time will be hosted on Zoom and is suitable for 2-5 years old with parental supervision.  Space is limited.

Tea Talk with Lisa See & Linda Louie

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full video by clicking on the link here.

Date: September 23, 2020

Time: 5pm – 6pm PDT

Moderator: Lan Ong

Guest Speakers: Lisa See & Linda Louie

Attention all tea lovers and book worms! Join Lisa See, renowned author, and Linda Louie, tea educator and owner of Bana Tea Company, for a conversational book talk and tea demonstrationLan Ong, FCAM Board Member and Managing Director of Wing Hop Fung, will host this unique and exciting program.     

Bring your favorite cup of tea and tune in virtually for Tea Talk on Wednesday, September 23, 2020 at 5 pm PDT. Listen in as Lisa shares the inspiration behind her bestselling book, “The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane.” The conversation will continue as Lisa and Linda talk about their travels together to China to research the rare Puer teaThe program will include a traditional tea demonstration performed by Linda, as well as an audience Q&A session.  

This program is the premiere event of CAM’s Tea Talk series. 

Thank you to our partners:

  • Wing Hop Fung
  • Bana Tea House

Special acknowledgement:

  • Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
  • Chinese American Citizens Alliance, Los Angeles Lodge
  • OCA-GLA

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series  

Date: September 16, 2020 

Time: 4:00 – 4:30 pm PDT  

HostKevineEcliserio 

Story teller: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library  

Book: Boy Dumplingsby Ying Chang Compestine 

Our next Kid’s Story Time with CAM is moving to Wednesday, September 16, 2020 @ 4pm PDT! Gather up the little ones and find a cozy spot to join along! We are continuing our partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library to present a short story time series featuring Asian American themed stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.    

Next on the series: Miss Rita reads Boy Dumplingsby Ying Chang Compestine.   

Space is limited, register for free now by clicking the link to Eventbrite at the top. The virtual story-time will be hosted on Zoom and is suitable for 4-8 years old with parental supervision.   

Story Time with the Chinatown Branch Library Series  


Date: September 1, 2020 

Time: 11:00 – 11:30 am PDT  

Host: Kevine Ecliserio  

Story teller: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library  

BookThe Runaway Wok by Ying Chang Compestine 

Gather the little ones and find a cozy spot for CAM’s live virtual story time on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 @ 11am PDTWe are continuing our partnership with the Chinatown Branch Library to present a short story time series featuring Asian American themed stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.    

Next on the series: Miss Rita reads THE RUNAWAY WOK by Ying Chang Compestine.   

Space is limited, register for free now. The virtual story-time will be hosted on Zoom and is suitable for 4-8 years old with parental supervision.    

An Untold Past: Chinese Americans in the South


The program has been recorded and archived.

You can watch the full panel discussion by clicking on the link here.

Speakers: Dr. John Jung (Historian),
Baldwin Chiu & Larissa Lam (Producers of Finding Cleveland

Moderator: Dr. Laureen D. Hom (Assistant Professor at Cal Poly Pomona)

Date: Thursday, August 27, 2020 

Pre-screening: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm PDT   Finding Cleveland by Baldwin Chiu via Vimeo (A link will be sent the day of the event though Eventbrite).

Time: 5:00 – 6:00 pm PDT    Panel Discussion via Zoom

 An Untold Past: Chinese Americans in the South explores the remarkable American stories told by Dr. John Jung, Baldwin Chiu and Larissa Lam. Dr. Jung, retired CSULB Professor and author of several books including “Southern Fried Rice: Life in a Chinese Laundry in the Deep South, will present a brief history of early Chinese migration to the southern states as well as his family’s story and personal memories of being the only Chinese family in Macon, Georgia between 1928 and 1956.  

Baldwin Chiu will join the conversation by sharing his journey to discovering his family lineage in Cleveland, MississippiChiu and Larissa Lam are the co-producer of the documentary short film, “Finding Cleveland. The film, directed by Lam, follows Chiu and his family on the path to uncover their roots. In “An Untold Past Chiu and Lam will discuss how uncovering his family history led them to learn about the early Chinese American community in the South who persevered through the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and later navigated through the Jim Crow era.      

The conversation will conclude with an audience Q&A, moderated by Dr. Laureen D. Hom, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Cal Poly Pomona 

Preceding the live Zoom program will be an opportunity to screen the award-winning documentary short film, “Finding Cleveland, co-produced by Baldwin Chiu and Larissa LamA separate Vimeo link to view the film will be provided with the Zoom program link. The 15-minute film will be available to view 1 hour prior to the program.    

Thank you to our community partners:

  • Visual Communications (VC) 
  • Chinese Historical Society of South California (CHSSC) 
  • Chinese Family  History Group Southern California
  • Chinese American Citizens Alliance (C.A.C.A.) Los Angeles Lodge
  • Delta State University
  • Mississippi Delta Chinese Heritage Museum

“Studying Our Past, Shaping Our Future” Third Panel Discussion 

The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full panel discussion by clicking on the link here.

CAM invites you to tune in on Saturday August 22, 2020 from 7:30 – 8:30 pm PDT for the third-panel discussion in the “Studying Our Past, Shaping Our Future” panel series via Zoom. Join us as our panelists discuss the topic of Multicultural Education. 

The majority of the program will be in Mandarin. More information can be found on the flyer. 

Kids Story Time with CAM & the Los Angeles Public Library Chinatown Branch


Date: August 18, 2020 

Time: 11:00 – 11:30 am PDT 

Host: Kevine Ecliserio 

Story teller: Rita Law – Children’s Librarian Chinatown Branch Library 

BookTwo of Everything by Lily Toy Hong 

CAM brings Story-Time home! Gather the little ones and find a cozy spot for CAM’s first live virtual story-time! We’ve teamed up with the Chinatown Branch Library to present a short story-time series featuring Asian American themed stories read by Children’s Librarian, Rita Law.   

Join us on Tuesday, August 18, 2020 @ 11am PDT as Rita reads TWO OF EVERYTHING, based on a Chinese folktale, retold and illustrated by Lily Toy Hong.    

Tickets are limited, register for free now by clicking the link in our bio. The virtual story-time will be hosted on Zoom and is suitable for 4-8 years old with parental supervision  

Studying Our Past, Shaping Our Future Panel Series

You can watch the full panel discussion on our Youtube channel by clicking on the link here.

This is the second panel discussion of our series, “Studying Our Past, Shaping Our Future” held on July 18, 2020 via ZOOM from 7:30pm to 8:30pm PDT. This program was in Mandarin.

Thank you to our panelists, Congresswoman Judy Chu, Cal Poly Pomona Professor, Zuoyue Wang, City of Eastvale Mayor Pro Tem, Jocelyn Yow, and moderators, President of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Mr. Lei Wang and CAM Board Member, Miss Tina He.

Arthur Dong Book Talk
Hollywood Chinese: The Chinese in American Feature Films

Event Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Time: 5:00-6:00 pm PDT

Event will be held via ZOOM

Register for free here

(Attendees will receive a ZOOM link for access via Eventbrite email the day before the event. Participants may log on 15 minutes prior to the event in case of technical issues)

Guest Moderator: Janet Yang

Share an evening with Arthur Dong, as he presents his first virtual book talk via ZOOM. The author-filmmaker will present a guided tour of Hollywood Chinese–which Kenneth Turan selected as a Los Angeles Times “Critic’s Choice”–featuring a visual feast of fascinating images and an array of film clips culled from Dong’s life-long research and passion for cinema history.

Inspired and expanding on his documentary film of the same name, the book explores the Chinese American impact on the Hollywood film industry from the early days of film to today’s box office hits. Mr. Dong examines the portrayal of Asian American culture in Hollywood and the celebration of culture to the subtle and not so subtle projection of stereotypes in movies. Guest Moderator, Golden Globe and Emmy award-winning Hollywood producer, Janet Yang, will engage in a discussion on how the book resonates with readers and the relevance in today’s climate.

The event will conclude with a Q&A and a chance to chat directly with Arthur Dong. During the live event, attendees will receive a 30% Off Promo Code to purchase the book. Attendees will also have the opportunity to request a personal inscription and autograph by the author for each book purchased.

To learn more about Arthur Dong follow the link to https://www.deepfocusproductions.com/

For more about Janet Yang go to https://janetyang.com/

About Arthur Dong:

A San Francisco Chinatown native, Arthur Dong is an Oscar-nominee, a Peabody and Sundance award-winning filmmaker, author, and curator whose work centers on Asian American, and LGBTQ stories. Dong’s films about Asian American history and culture include The Killing Fields of Dr. Haing S. Ngor (2015), Hollywood Chinese (2007), Forbidden City, U.S.A. (1989), and Sewing Woman (1987). Among his films on LGBTQ issues are Coming Out Under Fire (1994) and Licensed to Kill (1997). Dong has curated exhibitions showcasing his extensive archive of cultural ephemera, including Chop Suey on Wax: The Flower Drum Song Album, Forbidden City, USA, and his most recent, Hollywood Chinese, on display at the iconic Formosa Café in West Hollywood. Dong’s first book Forbidden City, USA: Chinatown Nightclubs 1936-1970 received an American Book Award in 2015.

Thank you to our community partners:

  • Angel City Press
  • Deep Focus Productions Inc.
  • Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
  • Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment
  • OCA-GLA
  • Visual Communications

Commemorating Vincent Chin


The program has been recorded and archived.
You can watch the full panel discussion by clicking on the link here.

Join us in a virtual panel discussion as we remember Vincent Chin’s legacy.

Event date: Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Time: 5 – 6pm PDT

A link to Zoom will be sent out a day before the event.

Register for free here

The Chinese American Museum is hosting a panel discussion to commemorate Vincent Chin’s legacy in an effort to sow awareness and understanding of the racial injustices that continue to plague America today.

The panelists will examine the brutal murder of Chin and the efforts of activism that sprawl from such moments in time. The conversation will continue by discussing the need for solidarity in an era of heightened violence against the AAPI community during the COVID-19 pandemic and the continued fight against systemic racism for the Black community.

The event is moderated by Paula Madison. The panelists include Renee Tajima-Peña, Stewart Kwoh, and Pamela Ng.

Thank you to our community partners:

  • Chinese American Citizens Alliance L.A. Lodge
  • OCA-GLA
  • Visual Communications

Studying Our Past, Shaping Our Future Panel Series

This is part one of a three-series panel. This program was held on June 23, 2020 via ZOOM. This program is in Mandarin.

The Digital Poetry Reading and Cut Paper Workshop will be conducted via Zoom and hosted by the Chinese American Museum and Bovey Lee.

Watch the live recording of the workshop here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GZxkiLI1is&t=209s

Thursday, May 14

6PM PST

Via Zoom – RSVP on Eventbrite Here 

Prepare for the workshop & download the outline and cutout here.

We’re celebrating Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month with Los Angeles based artist Bovey Lee. Join us as we follow along Lee as she demonstrates on screen the popular traditional Chinese paper-cutting art form. The workshop is inspired by “Paper Stephanie,” a poem written by Stephanie Burt and included in her book Advice from the Lights. Burt will be in attendance and will open the workshop with a reading of her poem.

The event will be held on Zoom. Attendees are encouraged to work alongside the artist, or simply watch the art made in progress during this digital workshop. The activity will explore representation and identity and viewers are encouraged to participate in the discussion.

Participants are invited to share their completed artworks with the museum after the conclusion of the workshop via Facebook and Instagram.

The workshop is only accessible via Zoom and will be recorded. A link to the workshop will be sent on the day of the event.

The workshop is part of The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest.

About the Facilitators:

Bovey Lee is a Hong Kong born, Los Angeles based artist known for her contemporary cut paper. Her recent works explore migration and its impact on one’s sense of identity, home, and belonging. Lee came to the United States to study art and has earned dual MFA degrees in painting from University of California at Berkeley and digital arts from Pratt Institute in New York. She has exhibited at museums and galleries worldwide, including Nevada Museum of Art, Nevada (solo); Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland; Museum Kunst der Westkueste, Foehr, Germany; Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong; Museum of Craft and Design, San Francisco; among others.

Follow the link for additional information about Bovey Lee and her work.

Stephanie Burt is the author of three poetry collections, Belmont, Parallel Play, and Popular Music, and several collections of critical works. Her other works include Don’t Read Poetry; Advice from the Lights; The Poem is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them; The Art of the Sonnet; Something Understood: Essays and Poetry for Helen Vendler; The Forms of Youth: Adolescence and 20th Century Poetry; Parallel Play: Poems; Randall Jarrell on W. H. Auden; and Randall Jarrell and His Age. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the London Review of Books, the Times Literary Supplement, The Believer, and the Boston Review.

Follow the link for additional information about Stephanie Burt and her work.

Commemorations of the Chinese Massacre of 1871

 

Visit the Commemoration page for detailed event information and educational resources.

 

Thursday, October 24, 2019 | 6:30-9:00 PM

Pico House

424 N Main St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

On October 24, 1871, seventeen Chinese men including a 15-year-old boy were killed by a mob in Los Angeles. Known as the Chinese Massacre of 1871, it was the culmination of growing anti-Chinese sentiment leading to racially motivated violence. 

The Chinese American Museum will host a vigil concert to commemorate the lives lost on that day. This multimedia program will feature a pre-performance talk, a musical performance, reading of the names of those who passed that day, candlelit vigil and a wreath-laying procession to the commemorative plaque. Join us after the program for a reception in the museum and a reflection activity in the courtyard. Visitors are invited to write their thoughts on a card and attach it to a tree, which will remain for 20 days as a memorial for all the lives lost in the historical tragedy and as a space for reflection on contemporary issues of race and violence.

This program is free and open to the public; however, RSVPs are kindly requested. To RSVP, visit our page on Eventbrite or email rsvp@camla.org. Facebook Page.

 

Encore Performance

Friday, October 25, 2019 | 3:30-5:30 PM

Scripps College Boone Recital Hall

241 E 10th St. | Claremont, CA 91711

On October 24, 1871, seventeen Chinese men including a 15-year-old boy were killed by a mob in Los Angeles. Known as the Chinese Massacre of 1871, it was the culmination of growing anti-Chinese sentiment leading to racially motivated violence. Join us for an encore performance at Scripps College. This multimedia program will feature a musical performance and reading of the names of those who passed on that fateful day.

This program is free and open to the public; however, RSVPs are kindly requested. To RSVP, visit our page on Eventbrite or email rsvp@camla.org. Facebook Page.

Part of a two-part presentation by the Chinese American Museum and El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument in collaboration with Scripps College. Major support provided by the Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing, & Transformation – Los Angeles. An encore performance will be held on October 25, 2019, at Boone Recital Hall at Scripps College.

14th Annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar

Saturday, October 12, 2019 | 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

USC Doheny Library

3550 Trousdale Pkwy | Los Angeles, CA 90089

The Chinese American Museum will be participating in the 14th Annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar at USC Doheny Library. Stop by our table!

All Day. All in one Place.

Come and celebrate the diversity of stories that make Southern California such a place of discovery. At the Los Angeles Archives Bazaar, presented by L.A. as Subject and the USC Libraries, anyone with an interest in the region’s history will find something of value. A broad array of institutions and archives will have experts on hand to show off their collections and answer questions.

In addition to the wealth of information on display from exhibitors, day-long programming will feature preservation workshops and enlightening presentations.

The USC Libraries serve as the host institution for L.A. as Subject, an alliance of libraries, museums, and other archival and cultural organizations. USC is minutes from downtown Los Angeles and is easily accessible by major freeways and the Metro Expo line. Doheny Library is located in the center of campus, adjacent to Alumni Park and across from Bovard Auditorium, on Trousdale Avenue. For information regarding parking on campus, visit the Parking Services Website.

For up-to-date information on featured programming at the Bazaar, go to laassubject.org/archives-bazaar. Event Page. Facebook Page.

CAM Archaeology Workshop

Thursday, October 3, 2019 | 3:45-5:00 PM

Asian Pacific Resource Center, Rosemead Library

8800 Valley Blvd | Rosemead, CA  91770

Join us for an Archaeology Workshop at the Rosemead Library. Take a look into the past with artifacts connected to Los Angeles’ Historic Chinatown. This workshop will introduce the field of archaeology, explore the history of Los Angeles’ historic Chinatown, and encourage critical thinking and analysis of objects and archival materials. Suitable for Children and Families. No registration is required. Space and supplies are limited.

Celebrating the Asian American LGBTQ+ Experience

Friday, September 27, 2019 | 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Chinese American Museum (Courtyard)

425 N. Los Angeles Street | Los Angeles, CA 90012

 

CELEBRATING THE ASIAN AMERICAN LGBTQ+ EXPERIENCE brings together Asian American artists, writers, and creative industry professionals in the LGBTQ+ community in historic downtown Los Angeles at the Chinese American Museum for Lambda Literary’s LitFest 2019 for an evening of community and celebrating art and creativity. CAM’s current exhibition, “Lightscapes: Reenvisioning the Shanshuihua,” reimagines the philosophies of Chinese landscape paintings with new media and immersive light-based installations. The masters of Chinese landscape art would often retreat to nature to examine the themes of harmony and balance in the cosmos, as well as find sanctuary in nature. For the LGBTQ+ community, finding balance and safety to express ourselves is one of the challenges of everyday life. Where do we go as a community to retreat and how do we find balance in our lives?

Lambda Literary and CAM invite you to join us for an evening of special performances, poetry readings and activities articulated with CAM’s current exhibitions and “Lightscapes: Reenvisioning the Shanshuihua.” Followed by a panel discussion and networking reception, this multimedia event celebrates art and creativity at the intersection of Asian American identity and the LGBTQ+ community.

This program is free and open to the public; however, RSVPs are kindly requested. To RSVP, visit the event page on Eventbrite or email rsvp@camla.org. Event page. Facebook Page.

 

Family Film + Picnic

Friday, August 2, 2019 | 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Chinese American Museum (Courtyard)

425 N. Los Angeles Street | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Lights, Camera, Action! Enjoy a summer evening with a film and picnic at the CAM Courtyard. Come bring your own food and a small blanket or towel to sit on! We will screen a family friendly film outdoors, host raffle prize giveaways, and have booths providing interactives for kids and the young at-heart. Admission to the museum and this family program is FREE. Event page.

 

Lecture – Chinese Abalone Merchants and Fishermen in 19th Century Santa Barbara

Saturday, July 27, 2019 | 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Gateway to Nature

130 Paseo De La Plaza | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Join us for a talk with archaeologist Linda Bentz that highlights Chinese abalone harvesting activities on the Channel Islands — a little-known history of California’s foodways. Bentz will discuss the fisheries and trade network founded by Chinese immigrants that connected the Californian coast to China during the nineteenth-century. Archival records and archaeological data from the article, Chinese Abalone Merchants and Fishermen in Nineteenth-Century Santa Barbara, California: A Study of Export Networks, co-authored with Todd J. Braje will be presented during the lecture. Admission to the museum and this program is FREE. Event page.

Nite Light : Summer Mixer

Thursday, July 18, 2019 | 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Chinese American Museum (Courtyard)

425 N. Los Angeles Street | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Join us for a Summer evening at the museum after-hours social. Enjoy art making, music, and food in the courtyard. Admission to the museum and this adult program is FREE. Event page.

Family Day – Cyanotypes

Sunday, June 16, 2019 | 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Chinese American Museum

425 N. Los Angeles Street | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Create prints with sunlight in a hands-on activity inspired by the cyanotypes of Wu Chi-Tsung, a featured artist in Lightscapes: Re-envisioning the Shanshuihua 光之景: 山水畫的當代想像. You’ll be able to make your own cyanotype prints and visit the immersive exhibition. Admission to the museum and this family program is FREE. All materials will be provided. Event page.

Family History Workshop

Saturday, June 8, 2019 | 2:30 – 3:30pm

Southern California Genealogical Society

417 Irving Dr | Burbank, CA 91504

CAM will present a Family History workshop at the Southern California Genealogical Society. This workshop will explore family activities that encourage recording and interpreting family histories through inter-generational exchange. There will be a brief introduction about the museum and discussion on how to facilitate your own family history activities with children 4th grade and up. All materials will be provided; participants will receive a copy of the museum’s publication “Family History Scrapbook,” which features twelve engaging activities based on topics of immigration, recipes, food, celebrations, heirlooms, jobs, and music. Event page.

To RSVP, email rsvp@camla.org with the subject line “Family History Workshop.”

Family Day – Storytime

Saturday, April 27, 2019 | 11:00 am – 3:00 pm

Chinese American Museum

425 N. Los Angeles Street | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Listening and sharing our stories is a great way to learn about each other. Join us for scheduled book readings at the museum. Hands-on activities will accompany the story-time readings throughout the day including a Spring tea meditation and art-making. Admission to the museum and this family program is FREE. All materials will be provided. Event page.

150th Anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad Lecture

Tuesday, May 7, 2019 | 6:00 – 9:00 pm

Chinese American Museum

425 N. Los Angeles Street | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Join us for a lecture and reception commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad with speaker and Associate Professor Julia H. Lee of the Department of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine.

On May 10, 1869, the railroads were joined in Promontory, Utah linking the east and west coasts. Facing poverty and civil war at home, laborers from Guangdong Province in China left home to make a living to support their families. Chinese railroad laborers were the first wave of Chinese immigrants in the United States and were recruited by railroad labor contractors to do dangerous and difficult jobs. This lecture will explore how the contributions of these workers to the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad were ignored and erased from the historical record and how Chinese American authors, artists, and descendants of the railroad workers have responded to this injustice as well as to the broader exclusion of Asians from the United States. Event page.

Survival and Loss: A Joint Discussion of Los Angeles and San Francisco Chinatowns

Thursday, March 7, 2019 | 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes, Room #405 (4th Floor)

501 North Main Street | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Group of news photographers snapping pictures of a Chinese man dressed as a coolie, ca. 1940. Digitally reproduced by the USC Digital Library; From the California Historical Society Collection at the University of Southern California.

Join California Historical Society and the Chinese American Museum at our host venue, LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes for a panel discussion on the dual creation, maintenance, preservation, and future of Los Angeles and San Francisco’s Chinatowns. Moderated by UC Riverside Associate Professor of History and Director of the Public History Program, Catherine Gudis, we will explore with historians, advocates, artists, and media specialists how these two Chinatowns emerged, were threatened, survived, and thrived. We will also consider possible futures for both as well as posit how we all can better celebrate and support these two historic spaces.

After the panel, join us at the Chinese American Museum for light snacks and a special evening viewing our exhibitions.

Speakers:

Moderated by: Cathy Gudis | Associate Professor of History and Director of UC Riverside’s Public History Program

Nayan Shah | Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity and History at the University of Southern California

Eddie Wong | Co-founder of Visual Communications

Steven Wong | Curator at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, formerly Interim Executive Director and Curator of the Chinese American Museum

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu | Professor and Chair of the Department of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine.

Visit the Facebook event page here. Download the event flyer here.

Meet our Moderator:

Cathy Gudis is Associate Professor of History and Director of UC Riverside’s Public History Program. She has worked for over twenty years with art and history museums, in historic preservation, and on multi-platform, place-based projects that focus on Southern California and explore how public space is privatized, landscapes racialized, and inequalities of access sustained. She co-founded two collectives: Project 51, whose Play the LA River urges Angelinos to reclaim the L.A. River as public space, and the Bureau of Goods Transport, a clearinghouse to explore the history and import of logistics from the LA Ports to the Inland Empire. Currently, Cathy is piloting the Relevancy & History Project partnership between UCR and California State Parks, aimed to foster community engagement and co-produce more inclusive historical interpretation. The author of Buyways: Billboards, Automobiles, and the American Landscape (Routledge, 2004) and coedited anthologies and articles on visual culture, Cathy is working on a book entitled Skid Row, By Design: History, Community, and Activism in Downtown L.A.

About our Panelists:

Nayan Shah is Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity and History at the University of Southern California. He is a historian with expertise U.S. and Canadian immigration, public health, law and Asian American political, social and cultural movements. Professor Shah wrote two award-winning books, Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality and the Law in the North American West (University of California Press, 2011) and Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown (University of California Press, 2001). He has worked with the National Park Service, Angel Island Foundation and the New York Historical Society to preserve, interpret and convey the history of Asian Americans. To learn more about his research projects and publications visit https://dornsife.usc.edu/cf/faculty-and-staff/faculty.cfm?pid=1043400.

Eddie Wong was one of the founders of Visual Communications where he directed the documentary films Wong Sinsaang, Pieces of a Dream, and Chinatown Two-Step. He served as Executive Director of NAATA/Center for Asian American Media from 1996 to 2006 and was the Executive Producer of Kelly Loves Tony and the series Searching for Asian America for PBS.

He later became the Executive Director of the Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation (AIISF) and produced several short video profiles of immigrants who were detained at Angel Island. In 2014, he served as Guest Curator for the Smithsonian Institution’s Asian Pacific American Center’s “A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America,” an online photo and video exhibition. His article “Broken Blossoms – Four Chinese Women and Their Journey from Slavery to Freedom” was published as the cover story in Prologue, the magazine of the National Archives, in Spring 2016.

He is currently co-curating “At First Light: The Dawn of Asian Pacific America,” a retrospective of Visual Communications first 20 years of documentary work in still photography, film, and video. The exhibit will be on display at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles from May 25, 2019 to October 20, 2019.

Steven Wong was born in the City of Angeles at Queen of Angels Hospital, a place that no longer exists. He is currently a curator at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery at Barnsdall Art Park. Previously he was the Interim Executive Director and the senior staff curator at the Chinese American Museum where he developed and implemented both contemporary art and history exhibitions. Steven has lectured at UC Santa Barbara and was an adjunct professor at Ventura College and Pasadena City College in Asian American Studies, History and Art Studio Departments. Since 2001 Steven has been collecting vintage postcards primarily depicting Los Angeles’ Chinatown and has amassed over 300 postcards; some of which he has transformed into art and public engagement projects over the years. Steven holds a Masters in Asian American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (1998) and a Master in Fine Arts from the University of California, Santa Barbara (2000).

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu is a professor and chair of the Department of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. She received her Ph.D. in U.S. History from Stanford University and previously taught for seventeen years at Ohio State University. She authored Dr. Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: the Life of a Wartime Celebrity (University of California Press, 2005) and Radicals on the Road: Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era (Cornell University Press, 2013). Her current book project, a collaboration with political scientist Gwendolyn Mink, explores the political career of Patsy Takemoto Mink, the first woman of color U.S. congressional representative and the co-sponsor of Title IX. Wu also co-edited Women’s America: Refocusing the Past, 8th Edition (Oxford 2015), Gendering the Trans-Pacific World (Brill 2017), and Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies (2012-2017). She also co-edits Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000 (Alexander Street Press).

In partnership with the Chinese American Museum, the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California, El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, and LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes

Commemoration of the Chinese Massacre of 1871

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Pico House

424 N. Main St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 42, Number 7319, 28 October 1871

On October 24, 1871, seventeen Chinese men including a 15-year-old were killed by a mob in Los Angeles’ historic Chinatown. Known as the Chinese Massacre of 1871, it was the culmination of growing anti-Chinese sentiment leading to racially motivated violence. The incident is said to have begun when Officer Jesus Bilderrain and rancher Robert Thompson responded to a gunfight between members of rival Chinese tongs that broke out resulting in the death of tong fighter Ah Choy. Officer Bilderrain was wounded and Robert Thompson was mortally wounded while responding to the altercation.
Word spread about the shooting of Officer Bilderrain and the death of Thompson, which sparked a riot that lasted for three hours and involved a mob of 500 Angelenos entering Chinatown to loot Chinese homes and businesses and to assault every Chinese person they could find. Join the Chinese American Museum and community leaders to commemorate all the lives lost on this fateful day 147 years ago.

Following the program, the museum will be open to view the exhibitions from 8-9 pm.

Visit the Facebook event page here. Download the event flyer here.

This program is presented by the Chinese American Museum and El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument. Event Chair is David Louie, Commissioner of El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument. Major support provided by the Friends of the Chinese American Museum with additional support provided by the Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing, & Transformation – Los Angeles.

 

13th Annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar

Saturday, October 20, 2018 | 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

USC Doheny Library

3550 Trousdale Pkwy | Los Angeles, CA 90089

The Chinese American Museum will be participating in the 13th Annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar on Saturday, October 20th at USC Doheny Library. Stop by our table!

For more than 20 years, the L.A. as Subject consortium has brought to life the diverse, often hidden stories that make Southern California such a fascinating place of discovery. In 2005, we inaugurated the Los Angeles Archives Bazaar to give anyone with an interest in the region’s history a one-stop opportunity to interact with dozens of archives, from large institutions to private collectors. In all, more than 70 archives are represented at this event, which is free and open to the public. For up-to-date information on featured programming at the Bazaar, go to laassubject.org/archives-bazaar. Facebook event page here.

CELEBRATING THE ASIAN AMERICAN LGBTQ+ EXPERIENCE

Thursday, October 4, 2018 | 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Chinese American Museum

425 N. Los Angeles St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

CELEBRATING THE ASIAN AMERICAN LGBTQ+ EXPERIENCE brings together queer identified artists, musicians, and writers in historic downtown Los Angeles at the Chinese American Museum for Lambda Literary’s LitFest 2018. CAM’s current exhibit “Don’t Believe The Hype: LA Asian Americans in Hip Hop” challenges and redefines what hip hop represents, specifically within the Asian American community and how hip hop itself allows for more exploration for gender and sexual identity, defying expectations of “traditional” expectations. But whose expectations shape our experiences? Our community, our parents, ourselves? What does it mean to be queer and Asian American and how does one experience inform the other? Lambda Literary and CAM invite you to explore the exhibit and join us for a panel discussion with D’LO, NATHAN RAMOS, KAY ULUNDAY BARRETT, KITTY TSUI, ADDIE TSAI, MAYA REDDY, and moderated by CB LEE, presented with support from The Gaysian Project. Facebook event page here.

REPRESENT, REPRESENT!
Asian Americans in Hip Hop

Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018 | 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Pico House

424 N. Main St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Hueman, Silent Power (detail), 2016, spray paint and acrylic on canvas, 30 in. x 30 in., courtesy of the artist.

CAM presents a summer evening of music by DJ Phatrick and speakers discussing representation of Asian Americans in the hip hop music industry. Don’t Believe the Hype: LA Asian Americans in Hip Hop, CAM’s current exhibition, explores the genre as an outlet of expression and as a site of resistance for the Asian American community. Speakers including Arnel Calvario, Jason Chu, DJ Kuttin Kandi, DJ Phatrick, and Richie Traktivist will explore how the community disrupts the passive “model minority” stereotype by pursuing artistic careers in hip hop as dancers, rappers, DJs, and producers and their challenges of navigating the music industry.

A Q&A discussion moderated by the co-curators Justin Hoover and Ninochka McTaggart, PhD will follow the presentations. This event also celebrates the launch of the zine published in conjunction with the exhibition. Extended hours Aug. 23: museum will be open from 5:00 to 6:30 pm before the program.

Major support for this program is provided by the Friends of the Chinese American Museum with additional support provided by the Department of Cultural Affairs, City of Los Angeles.

RSVP on Eventbrite.

Help us spread the word: download the flyer.

Family Day

Sunday, July 29, 2018 | 11:30 am – 3:00 pm

CAM Workshop Space

425 N. Los Angeles St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Join us for a day of printmaking to celebrate the museum’s latest exhibition Don’t Believe the Hype: LA Asian Americans in Hip Hop. Inspired by the silk-screened tote bags created by LA-based artist Shark Toof, you’ll be able to create your own prints using paint on paper. Add your own artistic flair by etching your custom designs on foam printing plates. After completing your masterpiece, visit the museum and explore the exhibition. Admission to the museum and workshop are free. Materials will be provided.

RSVP on Eventbrite.

Catalog Launch + Panel

Friday, February 23, 2018 | 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Pico House
424 N. Main St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Join us in celebrating the release of Circles and Circuits: Chinese Caribbean Art exhibition catalog with a reception and panel discussion featuring co-curator Alex Chang, catalog contributors: Lok Siu and Sean Metzger, and artists featured in the exhibition including Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, Richard Fung, and Yoland Skeete. The evening will include a screening of short films by Richard Fung, Peter Chin, and Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons during the reception. Visit Circles and Circuits II: Contemporary Chinese Caribbean Art at the Chinese American Museum before the reception and panel.  Extended hours — the museum will be open until 7pm on February 23, 2018. More details to come!

Lead support for this exhibition and publication is provided through grants from the Getty Foundation. Major support provided by the Friends of the Chinese American Museum with additional support provided by the Department of Cultural Affairs, City of Los Angeles.

RSVP by February 15: rsvp@camla.org

PST Family Day: Photomontages

Sunday, October 22, 2017 | 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
Pico House
424 N. Main St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Albert Chong, Aunt Winnie, 1995. Courtesy of the artist. © Albert Chong. On view in Circles and Circuits II at the Chinese American Museum.

Join us at the Pico House for a hands-on activity that takes a spin on
portraits. Inspired by Albert Chong’s photographs, families can
decorate their own photos with flowers, shells, and pebbles to create
a photomontage. Either bring in a photograph or print one out at a
printer station!

Accompanying our arts and crafts activity, the Chinese American Museum
will also host 3 docent led tours of the new exhibition, Circles and
Circuits II: Contemporary Chinese Caribbean Art. Learn about the
Chinese Caribbean diaspora and engage in a conversation about culture
and identity. Tours are approximately 30 mins long, running at 11:30
AM, 12:30 PM, and 1:30 PM. Each tour is limited to 10 adults with
children and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Please
sign in at the front desk. RSVP to rsvp@camla.org.

This program is held in conjunction with the exhibition Circles and Circuits, part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, on view in two parts at the Chinese American Museum and California African American Museum. Lead support for the exhibition and program is provided through grants from the Getty Foundation. Major support is provided by the Friends of the Chinese American Museum.

Albert Chong, The Sisters, 1993. Courtesy of the artist. © Albert Chong. On view in Circles and Circuits II at the Chinese American Museum.

 

Engaged Landscape

Saturday, November 4, 2017 | 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Gateway to Nature Center
130 Paseo de la Plaza | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Flora Fong, Temporada ciclónica, 2014. Courtesy of the artist. © Flora Fong. On view in Circles and Circuits I at the California African American Museum.

Hurricanes and marine pollution are environmental issues threatening the Caribbean. Artists in Circles and Circuits engage the Caribbean landscape in their work and challenge the image of the islands as “paradise.” Join us all day at the Gateway to Nature Center for a workshop featuring interpretive exhibits on the Caribbean environment and a hands-on art activity reusing natural resources like seashells and flowers. Co-presented by the Chinese American Museum and Western National Parks Association, this program is held in conjunction with Grand Avenue Arts: All Access and DTLA Regional Weekend in celebration of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. Lead support for the exhibition and program is provided through grants from the Getty Foundation. Major support is provided by the Friends of the Chinese American Museum with additional support for the program provided by Western National Parks Association. For more information on DTLA Arts & Culture Regional Weekend events, visit grandavearts.tumblr.com/dtlaregionalweekend.

Kathryn Chan, Measure of a Life (detail), 2017. Installation on view in Circles and Circuits II at the Chinese American Museum.

A Musical Journey feat. The Simpkin Project and Chinee Goldentouch

 

Friday, October 6, 2017 | 6:00 pm
Pico House
424 N. Main St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Across the street from CAM
Free to the Public | Please reserve a seat by emailing RSVP@camla.org

Co-presented by the Chinese American Museum and VP Records, join us at
Pico House for a reggae concert featuring The Simpkin Project and
Chinee Goldentouch. There will be a pre-concert talk about the Chinese
influence on Caribbean music highlighting Jamaica-born Pat Chin,
co-founder of VP Records -the largest independent reggae music
distributor. This event is held in conjunction with the exhibition
Circles and Circuits, part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, which
explores the art of the Chinese Caribbean diaspora from the early 20th
century to the present day. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of
the Getty. Lead support for the exhibition is provided through grants
from the Getty Foundation. Major support for the exhibition and
program is provided by the Friends of the Chinese American Museum with
additional support for the program provided by VP Records.  Limited
capacity. RSVP to rsvp@camla.org.

 

Movements, then and Now

Wednesday, April 12th, 2017 | 6:30 pm
Pico House
424 N. Main St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Across the street from CAM
Free to the Public | Please reserve a seat by emailing RSVP@camla.org

Asian American history is bound to activism, as CAM’s newest exhibition “Roots: Asian American Movements in Los Angeles, 1968 – 1980’s” demonstrates.  Yet the struggles of Asian American communities today- around immigrant rights, intersectional frameworks, housing & gentrification, economic justice, anti-blackness, artistic expression, and more- both resonate and simultaneously diverge with earlier movements.  In this urgent time, how do we stand for the oppressed and marginalized communities?  “Movements, then and Now,” a cross-generational and cross-movement discussion offers a space to recognize and consider these questions, connections to the past, and the future of Asian American activism.

Featuring:

Taz Ahmed
Phyllis Chiu
Alice Hom
Nobuko Miyamoto
Trina Pasumbal

Moderated by Ryan Wong, exhibit curator.

The museum will be open for guests before the event at 5 pm.

Back to Our Roots – Food and Identity: A Night of Conversation

Monday, April 24th, 2017 | 7:00 pm
Pico House
424 N. Main St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Across the street from CAM
Free to the Public | Please reserve a seat by emailing RSVP@camla.org

Why are some cuisines deemed “ethnic” and others not?  Who is their presumed audience?  What stories do chefs and writers feel they’re expected to tell- and what stories, perhaps, would they prefer to tell?

Food is a powerful way to explore ideas around identity, authenticity, and power.  Featuring food writers and chefs from restaurants Good Girl Dinette, Chengdu Taste, Cassia, and more, “Back to Our Roots” offers insightful conversations and dialogue around food, culture, and authenticity.

Co-sponsored by the Asian American Journalists Association.

Author Talk and Book Signing with Karen Ishizuka

Thursday, Feburary 9th, 2017 | 6:30 pm
Biscailuz Building
Basement
125 Paseo de la Plaza | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Across the plaza from CAM and across the street from Union Station
Free to the Public | Please reserve a seat by emailing RSVP@camla.org

Until the political ferment of the Long Sixties, there were no Asian Americans. There were only isolated communities of mostly Chinese, Japanese, and Filipinos lumped together as “Orientals.” Serve the People tells the story of the social and cultural movement that knit these disparate communities into a political identity, the history of how—and why—the double consciousness of Asian America came to be.

Karen L. Ishizuka is a third-generation American of Japanese descent who was part of the Asian American movement in Los Angeles. She is the author of Lost and Found: Reclaiming the Japanese American Incarceration, as well as many published articles, and coeditor of Mining the Home Movie: Excavations in Histories and Memories. An award-winning documentary film producer and museum curator, she helped establish the Japanese American National Museum and received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.


Honor and Duty: The Mississippi Delta Chinese

Honor and Duty: The Mississippi Delta Chinese is a documentary that examines a little known aspect of the Chinese American experience. Writer, director and producer E. Samantha Cheng will be on hand to introduce the film and conduct a Q&A following the screening.

Cheng is based in Washington, D.C. and has hundreds of broadcast and non-broadcast programs to her credit. She created the Asian Pacific American History Project and is co-founder of TPS, Inc., a television production services company.  She also co-founded Heritage Series, LLC, a firm specializing in interactive educational programs about U.S. history, and is an active member of the Asian American Journalists Association and Women in Film and Video.

Thursday, Nov. 17, 7 p.m.

South Pasadena Library Community Room
1115 El Centro St.
South Pasadena

More information can be found here.

Friday, Nov. 18, 1 p.m.

Shadow Park Clubhouse
12800 South St.
Cerritos, Calif 90703

Part of the Southern Chinese Picnic event. Finding Cleveland will also be screened.
John Jung will introduce both documentaries

Contact Gordon Hom by emailing gcrdcn (at) yahoo (dot) com for more information.

Sunday, Nov. 20, 2-4 p.m.

Monterey Park Bruggemeyer Library
318 S. Ramona Ave.
Monterey Park

More information can be found here.


Commemoration of the 1871 Los Angeles Chinese Massacre

Monday, October 24, 2016 | 7pm – 7:30pm
Chinese American Museum
CAM Courtyard
425 N. Los Angeles St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Join the Chinese American Museum and local leaders on Monday, Oct. 24, as we observe the 145th anniversary of the Chinese massacre.

Scheduled Speakers
Dr. Gay Yuen, Past President, Friends of the Chinese American Museum
Christopher Espinosa, General Manager for El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument
Hon. Judy Chu, U.S. House of Representatives (invited)
Hon. Ed Chau, California State Assembly
Hon. Mike Eng, Trustee of the LA Community College Board
Pamela Ng, Community Member
Moment of silence and the reading of the names of the victims will take place  
1871 Chinese Massacre

On the evening of Oct. 24, 1871, a Latino police officer and a white resident Robert Thompson entered Chinatown to break up a gun fight between members of rival Chinese tongs. Whether by anger or accident, Thompson was shot to death. Shortly thereafter, a mob of 500 Angelenos entered Chinatown and assaulted every Chinese person they saw.  Chinese homes and businesses were also looted. Eleven men, including Sheriff James Burns and prominent Los Angeleno Robert Widney, attempted to protect the Chinese and stop the violence, but they were ignored. After five hours, the vigilantes had tortured, shot and hanged 17 Chinese men and 1 boy. This incident drew national attention and provoked a grand jury investigation. Eight men were held responsible and was sentenced to Sam Quentin.  Their convictions were overturned by the California Supreme Court on a technicality a year later and all the convicted killers were released.

Please email educator@camla.org if you have any questions.

PARKING
There are many paid parking lots located around El Pueblo.  We are also conveniently located near several public transit stops and across the street from Union Station.

More information about parking can be found here:
http://elpueblo.lacity.org/GeneralInformation/Parking/index.htm


Film Screening
The Home of My Heart

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 | 7:30pm
Chinese American Museum
425 N. Los Angeles St. | Los Angeles, CA 90012

Award-winning Hong Kong film director Can To will debut her latest production, “The Home of My Heart,” at the Chinese American Museum on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 7:30 p.m. The 45-minute documentary-style film will be presented in Chinese and English with subtitles.

“The Home of the Heart” tells the story of Melody, a young woman determined to preserve the home of her ancestors–a place on the brink of drastic changes. Melody’s journey takes her from Hong Kong to California, beginning in Taishan, a small region in Southern China known for the large number of immigrants to the United States during the 19th century.

Ms. To is co-founder of the Hong Kong-based independent film company, Canto Works. Before starting her own firm, she was a senior producer at Radio Television Hong Kong (RTHK), where she produced over 20 episodes of the acclaimed documentary series, Hong Kong Connection.

She is internationally acclaimed for such films as Little Photographer, the story of young photographers in Sichuan after the May 12, 2008 earthquake, which won the 2010 New York International Film Festival Gold Award; and A War Without Guns, a documentary about children orphaned by AIDS in China, which won the 2005 United Nations Department of Public Information (UNDPI) Silver Award.

In addition to RTHK, To’s films have been broadcast by the Discovery Channel.

Seating for the free screening is limited.  Reservations may be made by email to rsvp@camla.org.

We gratefully acknowledge the following sponsors whose support have helped make this event possible.

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Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China
A Discussion with Paula Madison

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 | 1:30pm -2:45pm
Cal State LA | University Student Union Theater
5154 State University Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90032

campus map: http://www.calstatela.edu/univ/maps/index.php

Free to the public | RSVP to rsvp@camla.org

In support of Winter 16 lecture of the AAAS Scholars Lecture Series at Cal State LA and “Tales of the Distant Past: The Story of Hong Kong and the Chinese Diaspora (A Tribute of the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals)” exhibition at the Chinese American Museum

Three successful black siblings from Harlem, Paula Williams Madison and her brothers, Elrick and Howard Williams, were raised in Harlem by their Chinese Jamaican mother, Nell Vera Lowe.  The three travel to the Toronto Hakka Chinese Conference to discover their heritage by searching for clues about their long-lost Chinese grandfather, Samuel Lowe. As the mystery of their grandfather’s life unfolds, the trio travels to Jamaica, to learn about grandfather’s life.

Taking family tree research to an epic proportion, the siblings and 16 of their family members travel to two Chinese cities, Shenzhen and Guangzhou. Together, they visit their family’s ancestral village, finding documented lineage that dates their family back 3,000 years to 1006 BC. The trip culminates in an emotional and unforgettable family reunion with 300 of their grandfather’s Chinese descendants. Paula Madison will discuss her film and her journey in finding Samuel Lowe.

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Author McCunn Explores APIs in Civil War

Saturday, September 12, 2015 | 10:00 am
Alhambra Civic Center Library

Award-winning author Ruthanne Lum McCunn uncovers a little known facet of Chinese American history when she presents Hidden History: Asians and Pacific Islanders in the American Civil War, on Saturday, Sept. 12, 10 a.m. to noon, at the Alhambra Civic Center Library.

In recent years, researchers have learned that approximately 300 Asians and Pacific Islanders served in the Civil War.  McCunn’s latest book, Chinese Yankee, tells the true story of Thomas Sylvanus (Ah Yee Way), a Hong Kong orphan who was sent to America in the mid-1850s for schooling but was enslaved in Baltimore. He ultimately fled to the north and fought in the Freedom Army.

Open to the public free of charge, the Sept. 12th program is presented by the Chinese Family History Group of Southern California in partnership with the Chinese American Citizens Alliance, Chinese American Museum, and Chinese Historical Society of Southern California.

The library is located at 101 S. 1st St., Alhambra.  Parking will be available in the Alhambra Civic Center lot.  For directions, call (626) 570-5008 or go to www.alhambralibrary.org/hours.html.


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a1420-24aThe Changing LAndscape of the United States

Thursday, May 28, 2015 | 7:00pm
Chinese American Museum

Panel Discussion
Please email RSVP@camla.org to reserve a seat

50 Years since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act

The 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act’s authors may not have fully realized the role that the Act would play in changing the face of the United States, and significantly increasing the number of Asian and Latino immigrants. This panel discussion will commemorate 50 years of this monumental point in American history and discuss its impact in Los Angeles.

This FREE event will be moderated by Linda Vo, Associate Professor of the Department of Asian American Studies, School of Humanities, of UC Irvine.

Panelists will include:

– Jose Calderon, Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Chicano/a and Latino/a Studies, Pitzer College
– The Honorable Mike Eng, Board of Trustees, Los Angeles Community College District
– Stewart Kwoh, President & Executive Director, Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Department of Cultural Affairs
OCA-GLA
UCLA Labor Center
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Los Angeles County
LA Plaza de Cultura Y Artes

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Signing of the Immigration Act of 1965

President Lyndon B. Johnson gives Edward (Ted) Kennedy a pen, while others, including Robert Kennedy and Vice President Hubert Humphrey look on

LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto

 

SamuelLowe&Family_1927

Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China
Screening and Author Talk with Paula Madison

Wednesday, May 20, 2015 | 6:30pm
Chinese American Museum

We love the overwhelming support of film screening of ‘Finding Samuel Lowe’ with Paula Madison on May 20th. Unfortunately, we have reached maximum capacity and cannot accept anymore RSVPs. Any guests that have sent their reservations to RSVP@camla.org should have received a confirmation from us.

If anyone who RSVP’d, but can no longer attend, please contact the front desk at 213.485.8567.

###

Three successful black siblings from Harlem, Paula Williams Madison and her brothers, Elrick and Howard Williams, were raised in Harlem by their Chinese Jamaican mother, Nell Vera Lowe. The three travel to the Toronto Hakka Chinese Conference to discover their heritage by searching for clues about their long-lost Chinese grandfather, Samuel Lowe. As the mystery of their grandfather’s life unfolds, the trio travels to Jamaica, to learn about grandfather’s life.

Taking family tree research to an epic proportion, the siblings and 16 of their family members travel to two Chinese cities, ShenZhen and GuangZhou. Together, they visit their family’s ancestral village, finding documented lineage that dates their family back 3,000 years to 1006 BC. The trip culminates in an emotional and unforgettable family reunion with 300 of their grandfather’s Chinese descendants.

Facebook: FindingSamuelLowe
Twitter and Instagram: @findingsamlowe

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Chinese Family History Group of Southern California
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
GE
Asian and Asian American Studies @ Cal State LA
Visual Communications
Asian American Studies Center @ UCLA


 

Flickr user ericrichardson2

Exploring the History of Chinese Pioneers: A Hike to Elysian Park

Saturday, May 2, 2015 | Starts at 8am
Chinese American Museum
Difficulty: easy, two star **, 7 miles; suitable for the whole family
Elevation gain/loss:   +600/-600 ft.

Join us for a half-day, 7-mile easy, half-street, half-trail hike to Elysian Park, concluding with a dim sum lunch.

Elysian Park was one of the training grounds for a secret army to support General Homer Lea/Dr. Sun Yat-Sen during the Chinese Revolution of 1911. A series of battles defeated the Qing Dynasty and established the Republic of China. The shooting range that trained 300 cadets during the Revolution is now the home of the Los Angeles Police Academy.

The hike will begin at the Chinese American Museum and end at a dim sum restaurant in Chinatown. Historical highlights of these Chinese Pioneers will be shared during the hike. The registration cost will cover the cost of the meal. Participants who wish to opt-out of the dim sum lunch will still need to pay for the full price of registration.

Recommended materials to bring:

  • 1 quart of water
  • Snacks
  • Hiking boots
  • First aid kit
  • Extra clothing

Please check the weather and dress accordingly. All participants must sign the liability waiver form before the hike; waivers can be viewed and downloaded here. Parents must provide consent and sign the waiver for participants under 18 years of age.

Please purchase your tickets in advance at here Brown Paper Ticket. For inquiries, please email rsvp@camla.org or call (213) 485-8567.

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Photo used with permission, creative common license, Eric Richardson, Flickr user ericrichardson


 

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Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants with Judy Yung

Saturday, March 28, 2015 | 10am
Chinese American Museum

Judy Yung, Professor Emeritus of American Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz and co-editor of the newly published 2nd ed. of Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island, 1910-1940, will discuss new research, poetry and oral histories of Chinese immigrants detained at the Angel Island Immigration Station.

Island tells these immigrants’ stories while underscoring their relevance to contemporary immigration issues. First published in 1980, this updated edition includes a new historical introduction, 150 annotated poems in Chinese and English translation, extensive profiles gleaned through oral histories, and dozens of additional photographs from public archives and family albums.

Books will be available for purchase and signed by Yung.

Space is limited. Reserve your space by emailing cfhgsc@gmail.com

Co-Presenters
家譜 Chinese Family History Group of Southern California – a Southern California Genealogical Society (SCGS) Interest Group and the Chinese American Museum

Community Partner
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California


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Lantern Festival
March 7, 12 Noon – 7 PM
Chinese American Museum

Visit www.camla.org/LALanternFestival for more details


 

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Social and Cultural Understandings of Being Disabled
December 14, 2014 | 3pm
Chinese American Museum

Join the Chinese American Museum as we explore the cultural barriers and stigmas surrounding mental, physical, and developmental disabilities in the Asian American community.

In Support of Transpacific Ties: Bridging Los Angeles and Hong Kong Through Art, an exhibit currently on view at the Chinese American Museum.

SPEAKERS

Raymond Kwong
Leadership Graduate
Asians and Pacific Islanders with Disabilities of California

Francis Siu, Ph.D., C.R.C.
Special Education and Counseling
California State University,Los Angeles.

Peter Wong, Ph.D.
Research Director,
Asians and Pacific Islanders with Disabilities of California

Please reserve your seat by emailing RSVP@camla.org

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Chinese American Citizens Alliance – Los Angeles Lodge
Exceptional Children’s Foundation
Charter College of Education – Cal State LA


 

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Chinese Islamic Cuisine: A Delectable Discussion
December 7, 2014 | 6pm

Chinese Islamic Restaurant
7727 E. Garvey Ave.
Rosemead, CA 91770

Directions to the Restaurant

$20 per person | $18 per CAM member

Join the Chinese American Museum as we host a dinner and engaging discussion at China Islamic Restaurant in Rosemead about the Muslim population in China and the role of Islam in Chinese culture.

Since the 7th century, Chinese Muslims have been a national ethnic minority, whose population is currently estimated at 30 million in the country, primarily in the northwest province. Chinese halal food evidences the cultural and culinary historical influence of the Silk Road, and brings it to 21st-century Los Angeles.

Featured dishes will include traditional green onion sesame bread, stews, and noodle dishes.
Chinese Islamic Cuisine: A Delectable Discussion is part of the LA / Islam Arts Initiative.  The initiative is presented by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) with major support from the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, the National Endowment for the Arts, the California Community Foundation, the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts), the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation, and the Sister Cities of Los Angeles Organization.

RSVP is required.  Space is limited.  You can reserve a seat by emailing rsvp@camla.org

Photography Courtesy of Rubina H. (yelp user)

 


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Liquid Heat: The Evolution, Production, and American Obsession of Hot Sauces
June 5, 2014 | 7pm
Chinese American Museum

Looking back to the 17th Century, Charles Perry discusses British attempts to make imitation soy sauce and its role in the evolution of hot sauces, and director Griffen Hammond screens his short documentary Sriracha that chronicles Huy Fong Food owner David Tran and the cult following that Sriracha has developed.

A Discussion by Charles Perry
Co-founder and President of the
Culinary Historians of Southern California

A Screening of Sriracha
by Griffin Hammond
Director and Writer

Community Partners
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Department of Cultural Affairs – Los Angeles
Cal Humanities
Culinary Historians of Southern California

*This project was made possible with support from Cal Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, visit www.calhum.org.


 

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A Decade of Change: Asian Pacific America from 2003-2014
Tuesday, May 27, 2014 | 7pm
Chinese American Museum

The Chinese American Museum celebrates its 10th anniversary by reflecting on events, challenges, and achievements within Asian Pacific America during the past decade. We invite you to join us as community members look back at events, community issues and policies that have impacted our communities in recent history.

PANELISTS

  • Warren Furutani, Director of  Serve the People Institute
  • Stewart Kwoh, First Vice Chair, Board of Directors of Asian American Advancing Justice
  • Ryan Wong, Curator of ‘Serve the People: The Asian American Movement in New York’

MODERATOR

Linda Vo, Department of Asian American Studies of University of California, Irvine

Please reserve your seat by emailing rsvp@camla.org or by calling 213.485.8567

‘A Decade of Change: Asian America from 2003-2014’ is part of CAM’s 10th Anniversary programming and observes Asian Pacific Islander American Heritage Month.


Past Events

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Let’s Dish it Out!  A Discussion on Asian American Foodies
May 13, 7 PM
Chinese American Museum

Asian Americans utilize social media more than any other ethnic group in the United States.  This may explain why there appears to be a disproportionate number of Asian American food bloggers and “Yelpers” in Los Angeles.  This panel explores the growing influence and role of Asian Americans in contemporary Los Angeles food trends. Are Asians Americans truly the new “taste-makers” in Los Angeles, or even nationally?

Moderated by Nguyen Tran of Starry Kitchen, a formerly underground kitchen gone legal, the panel will include:
  • Cathy Chaplin, writer of ” The Food Lover’s Guide to Los Angeles” and creator of gastronomyblog.com.
  • Robert Ji-Song Ku, author of Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA, co-editor of Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader, and Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at Binghamton University.

Reserve your seat by email rsvp@camla.org

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Cal Humanities
Department of Cultural Affairs – City of Los Angeles
OCA-GLA
Culinary Historians of Southern California
Project by Project

“This project was made possible with support from Cal Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, visit www.calhum.org.”


Lantern Festival
March 1, 12 Noon – 10 PM
Chinese American Museum

Visit www.camla.org/LALanternFestival for more details


Author Talk with Sylvia Sun Minnick
March 18th, 7 PM
Chinese American Museum

The Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles hosts community activist and author Sylvia Minnick on March 18, 2014. Abandoned as an infant and raised as a refugee in Japanese-occupied Malaya during World War II, Never a Burnt Bridge is a memoir of humility, humor and pluck.

Reserve your seat by email rsvp@camla.org

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Friends of the Chinatown Library
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Chinese American Citizens Alliance


Past Events

CAM Exhibition Remix
January 19th, 2 – 4 PM
Chinese American Museum

Ten years ago CAM opened its doors to share with the public the Chinese American experience and the history in the region.  To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we revisit a few of these exhibits to discuss these topics through artistic expression. You will receive a unique experience of seeing selected works displayed once again, but this time, occupying the same space with one another to tell a new story.


El Pueblo Tree Lighting Ceremony
December 6th, 5pm – 9:45pm
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument

Kick off your holiday cheer with a season’s greeting card of your own making. Use the festive surroundings of El Pueblo to inspire memorable papercraft with your own personal holiday messages, guaranteed to generate warm smiles on a winter’s night. We provide the paper, markers, glue and scissors. You provide the creativity.


Origins: Uncovering Your Family History
December 14th, 10am – Noon
Chinese American Museum

In partnership with the Chinese Family History Group of Southern California, the Chinese America Museum will host Origins: Uncovering Your Family History on Saturday, December 14th at 10am to assist those who are beginning their quest to research and record their Chinese family histories.

Do you wish you knew more about your family’s history in China and in America, but don’t quite know how to begin to do the research? Do you want to find out how and why your ancestors immigrated and what kind of lives they led once they settled here? Would you like to uncover information and stories about your ancestors and their descendants, perhaps to construct your family tree, record your family history, or pen a biography of an interesting relative?

Join us as we share important resources for Chinese family history research and genealogy, tips on interviewing your relatives, visiting the National Archives to find immigration and Exclusion Act files, and what to know about Chinese names when doing research. Speakers will also highlight stories and case studies from their personal research on their ancestors.

Event is open to the public.  Please reserve your seat by emailing rsvp@camla.org

SPONSORS
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Friends of the Chinatown Library
Asian Pacific Resource Center – County of Los Angeles Library
Asian Pacific American Library Association
Pacific Asia Museum


Monterey Park in the 80s and 90s:
Storefront Signage and the English-Only Movement
November 14th, 6:30 – 8:30 PM
Chinese American Museum

On Thursday, November 14th at 6:30pm, the Chinese American Museum will host a panel discussion on the controversy that enraged the ethnically diverse community of Monterey Park. Beginning in the 80s, the Slow-Growth movement and the English-Only movement, were attempts to slow down the population growth and limit Chinese language storefront signage. A recent review of the general code regarding signage in August 2013 has reignited the debate.

Join community members Jose Calderon, Ph.D. and Leland Saito, Ph.D. as they share how they organized against these movements; Los Angeles Times journalist Frank Shyong will also discuss his coverage of the community’s reactions this year when Monterey Park was forced to confront its past.

Event is open to the public.

Please reserve your seat on facebook or by emailing rsvp@camla.org.

More information on Monterey Park and the English-Only Movement can be found here: goo.gl/dYPX6c

Sponsors:
El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Cal State LA – Asian & Asian Americans Studies Program
C.A.C.A. – Los Angeles Lodge
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
Pitzer College’s Center for Asian Pacific American Students


Unity Observance
October 24th, 7 – 8:30 PM
Chinese American Museum

In Los Angeles on October 24, 1871, a mob of 500 local vigilantes publicly lynched and shot to death 18 Chinese men and boys in one of the most deadly incidents of racial violence ever recorded in the American West.  In the late 1800s and 1900s, anti-Chinese sentiment spread across the America and outbreaks of violence were recorded in Washington, Wyoming and Mexico against the Chinese.

The Chinese American Museum will host a discussion on October 24, 2013 to mark the 142nd year of the Chinese Massacre.  The event will feature a short film from film-maker Valerie Soe and a discussion from Dr. Robert Romero.  The Honorable Mike Eng will close the evening.

Event is open to the public.

Please reserve your seat by emailing rsvp@camla.org

More information can be found on our facebook event page by clicking here.

Sponsors:

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Cal State LA – Asian & Asian Americans Studies Program
Visual Communications
C.A.C.A. – Los Angeles Lodge
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California
OCA-GLA
UCLA Asian American Studies Center


Shaping Los Angeles: The History Behind Historic Chinatown and Union Station
August 10th, 1 – 3:00 PM
Chinese American Museum

Join the Chinese American Museum and our community partners as we explore the significance of Alameda and Los Angeles Street while taking a closer look at the location of both Historic Chinatown and Union Station.

More information can be found on our facebook event page by clicking here.

Past Events

2013 Lantern Festival
March 2nd, Noon – 7:00 PM
Chinese American Museum

Join us for the 12th annual Lantern Festival and street fair. More information here.


2013 National Art Contest
Deadline for Submissions: March 8th, 3:00 PM

The Chinese American Citizens Alliance’s National Art Competition in Parntership with the Chinese American Musiceum are pleased to announce a juried nationwide art competition for students during the 2012-1013 school year. Click here for more information.


N is for Neighborhood
Sunday, September 23, 2012 with Audrey Chan
11 a.m.–3 p.m.
CAM at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
No RSVP required

Join artist Audrey Chan in an activity sure to stimulate your creativity. This interactive,
family-friendly workshop encourages visitors to create original artworks about their unique neighborhoods. Families will craft postcards and participate in a collaborative video inspired by letters of the alphabet.


16th Annual Historymakers Awards Banquet!
Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012
5p.m. President’s Reception & Silent Auction /6:30 p.m. Dinner & Awards Program
Venue to be announced

Join Honorary Diner Chair, Charlie Woo, and the Board of the Friends of the Chinese American Museum at the 16th Annual Historymakers Awards Banquet! Prominently recognized as one of the premiere Chinese American events in Southern California, the Banquet honors the achievements of extraordinary individuals who have made a significant impact or lasting contributions towards the advancement of the Chinese American community and beyond in the fields of art, literature, journalism, medicine, film, science, business, government, law, athletics, and their community. In addition, the Banquet also serves as the major annual fundraiser for CAM, helping to raise critical funds to cover operational and program costs.


Artist Tour and Discussion
Sunday, October 28th
2–3 p.m. General Public / 3–4 p.m. Members only*
CAM at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument

Learn more about the creative process and the inspiration behind the art on an in-depth tour with the exhibition artists. Whether shaped by personal experience or influenced by historical or current events, the works of art featured in the exhibit take on a grand life of their own, adding visual commentary to the rapidly changing views of Chinatown. Featured artists to be announced.

To RSVP, call (213) 485-8567 or email rsvp@camla.org by Friday, October 26.
* The 3–4 p.m. members-only event includes refreshments and conversations with the artists.


The Accidental Sociologist in Asian American Studies – Book Talk and Signing with Professor Min Zhou
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at 7:00PM
at Chinese American Museum
425 N. Los Angeles Street | Los Angeles, CA 90012

The Chinese American Museum & the UCLA Asian American Studies Center Endowed Chairs Research Series are pleased to present The Accidental Sociologist in Asian American Studies – Book Talk and Signing with Professor Min Zhou. The Accidental Sociologist recounts Min Zhou’s journey of critically examining the ever-changing experience of Chinese/Asian Americans. Zhou will discuss how contemporary patterns of Chinese immigration, settlement, and integration differ from those of the past and how Chinese Americans are positioned in 21st-century American society. Particular attention will be paid to the San Gabriel Valley.

Books will be available for purchase. The talk will be followed by a reception and a tour of the Chinese American Museum. For more information on the event, contact UCLA Asian American Studies Center: www.aasc.ucla.edu / 310-825-2975. Click here for the FLYER


Stories From Chinese America: An Arthur Dong Dvd Release Event and Reception
Saturday, November 6, 2010 / 3:00pm – 5:00pm
The National Center for the Preservation of Democracy
(111 N. Central Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90012)

Come celebrate the launch of a new, limited-edition DVD anthology by renowned documentary filmmaker Arthur Dong. Headlining the event will be a screening of the newly scored 1916 silent film, THE CURSE OF QUON GWON, the earliest known Chinese American feature film that Arthur helped to rescue during his work on the documentary, HOLLYWOOD CHINESE.

Dong will be present to give a tour of the many hours of extra archival and interview footage that comes with this new DVD anthology. A reception sponsored by the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California, with a donation by API Equality-LA, will follow the screening.

Presented by Visual Communications and co-presented with the Chinese American Museum, Chinese Historical Society of Southern California, API Equality-LA, Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment and Organization of Chinese Americans – Greater Los Angeles chapter.

Click here for the event flier [pdf].


Hollywood Chinese Film Screening and Curator Talk with Arthur Dong
Thursday, December 3, 2009 / 6–8 p.m.
CAM at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
Co-presented by Visual Communications

Lights, camera, action! The film that inspired the exhibit—Arthur Dong’s Award-Winning documentary, Hollywood Chinese! The 90-minute film screening was kicked-off with an insightful Curator Talk with Arthur Dong, where he discussed the origins, inspirations and motivations for the Hollywood Chinese project.


“Shanghai Girls” Book Talk with Lisa See / Thursday, October 29, 2009 / 6–8 p.m.
CAM at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument

Presented in partnership with Facing History and Ourselves’ Community Conversation series, New York Times best-selling author Lisa See presented and signed her latest novel “Shanghai Girls” (2009), which follows the story of two sisters through 1930s Shanghai, Angel Island, and Los Angeles Chinatown. This program continued the dialogue of Chinese and Chinese American presence in Hollywood sparked by the exhibit, Hollywood Chinese: The Arthur Dong Collection.


Hollywood Chinese Red Carpet Exhibit Reception / Friday, October 23, 2009 / 6–8 p.m.
CAM at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument
FOR MEMBERS ONLY

CAM members enjoyed a Hollywood-styled grand opening of the Hollywood Chinese: The Arthur Dong Collection exhibit complete with red carpet access! The celebratory evening included celebrity guests, delicious refreshments, and an exclusive opportunity to preview the blockbuster exhibition before it opened to the general public.


The 13th Annual Historymakers Awards Banquet Sunday, Sept. 20, 2009
5pm President’s Reception and Silent Auction/ 6:30pm Dinner
Hilton Hotel in Universal City

A premiere event in Southern California, this annual banquet heralds the inspiring achievements of individuals and organizations who have made significant contributions to the Chinese American community. In addition, this event also serves as the chief fundraiser for CAM. We invite you to make history with us as a guest, sponsor or volunteer! Click here for more info: Historymakers 2009


New CAM Website / Launch date: May 2009

Check out CAM’s new website! The newly designed site will feature an inviting modern look that balances Chinese design elements with a local, contemporary vibe. Improved user-friendly navigation, a cleaner, streamlined homepage, quality presentation of cultural, historical and educational content and interactive features like secured online membership registration, a search engine, and social media tags will enhance the user experience. In celebration of the launch, all online membership sign-ups and renewals during the months of May and June will receive a free gift! See details below.


Special Membership Promotion / May and June 2009

In celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and the launch of our newly redesigned website, CAM will be offering a special membership promotion beginning May 1, 2009 thru June 30, 2009. All ONLINE membership sign-ups and renewals will receive a FREE “Hollywood Chinese” documentary poster autographed by award-winning filmmaker, Arthur Dong. This keepsake gift is a prelude to CAM’s upcoming blockbuster exhibition, “Hollywood Chinese” opening this fall. The gifts are for pick-up only at the museum, one poster per membership signup and/or renewal, while supplies last.


CAM co-presents three films at the 25th Anniversary Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival / April 30 – May 7, 2009

CAM is proud to co-present three noteworthy films at Visual Communications’ (VC) 25th Anniversary Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival, happening April 30, 2009 – May 7, 2009! Join us in supporting VC and the film festival by purchasing tickets at www.vcoline.org. We hope to see you at the screenings of:

WHO KILLED VINCENT CHIN?:

On June 9 1982, at the height of anti-Japanese fervor in the U.S. Vincent Chin, a Chinese American Draftsman, was bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat by two autoworkers. Christine Choy and Renee Tajima’s Academy Award-nominated documentary explores the Vincent Chin Story, raising questions about the complexity of race relations, immigrant life, and labor hostilities during a period of US “trade war” with Japan.

CHILDREN OF INVENTION:

Based on Tze Chun’s own award-winning short film WINDOWBREAKER, which screened at the 2007 Los Angles Asian Pacific Film Festival, CHILDREN OF INVENTION is a drama about the influence of an adult world on children, the immigrant mentality, and shortcuts to the American dream.

DIM SUM FUNERAL*:

In a stately home, sixty-something Mrs. Xiao lies in her bed, immobile, eyes shut. Her longtime housekeeper and, some might say her only friend, Viola Gruber, must now call each of the four children to inform them their mother has passed away. All the Xiao children had issues with their mother. Mrs. Xiao had made them compete for her affections pitting one against the other, and, so they came to view one another as opponents. And they still do. Now here they are, gathered in the mansion built by their late father… to bid farewell to their mother.


Democracy and Diversity Art Contest / Dec. 14, 2008 – March 6, 2009

The Chinese American Museum in partnership with the Chinese American Citizens Alliance (C.A.C.A) is launching a public art contest for students in grades K-12. Themed Democracy and Diversity, students are encouraged to submit artwork and a brief statement that reflects what democracy means to them. Twenty-four winners will be chosen from this contest.


Lantern Festival 2009 / Saturday, February 7, 2009

Everyone’s favorite community tradition is celebrating its eighth year at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument! Lantern Festival 2009 will spotlight the sights and sounds of this popular Chinese holiday with a recreation of a traditional village street fair featuring brilliant lantern displays, exciting stage performances, a variety of interactive workshops showcasing Chinese traditional and culturally-diverse arts and crafts, and a new evening film screening to experience. Save the date now — participation at the festival will be free of charge as always!


Underground Undergrads: UCLA Undocumented Immigrant Students Speak Out / March 8 at 1pm at CAM

CAM is proud to partner with the Organization of Chinese Americans, UCLA Labor Center, and the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council to present an in-depth discussion based on a new UCLA Labor Center book, Underground Undergrads that profile immigrant students and the issues and struggles they face in completing their degrees without the aid of governmental financial assistance. Admission is free, please RSVP by calling (213) 485-8567 by March 5, 2009.